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Articles & Local History > 1886 - TAMPICO TORNADO April 10 - Dec. 25, 1886

Submitted by Les Niemi

April 10, 1886

Last Saturday some of our farmers came to town in cutters.

 

April 10, 1886

Next week Saturday this village will elect a school director

 

April 10, 1886

Fresh Apples, Lemons and Oranges at LaDUE’s Grocery and Restaurant.

 

April 10, 1886

The straight “People’s Low Tax Ticket” was elected by a majority ranging from 14 to 44.

 

April 10, 1886

J.K. CHESTER, the Sterling Dry Goods man, buys for cash and sells for cash, that’s the reason of his low price.

 

April 10, 1886

Stock desired for pasture the coming season. – A.E. JACOBS & J.W. WHITE.

 

April 10, 1886

Choice family Groceries [sic] at the Bonton.  Stock always full and fresh.  E.B. CUMMINGS Prop.

 

April 10, 1886

John PLUMLEY, of Prophetstown, has failed and failed badly.  But few from here were caught; but Prophetstownites will get left badly.

 

April 10, 1886

The M.E. church was well filled last Sabbath evening and the large audience listened to a Temperance address by Rev. F. STRINGER.

 

April 10, 1886

“That’s a fine flavored cigar you are smoking, where did you get it?”  “At the Bouton Restaurant, of course.  They keep none but the best cigars there.”

 

April 10, 1886

DelosCRADDOCK and Marion JACOBS have been inspecting the saleable horses in this vicinity this week.  They want some twenty head to take back with them.

 

April 10, 1886

George R. LESTER writes us from State Center, Iowa, his present residence, sending the cash for the renewal of his subscription to the Tornado.

 

April 10, 1886

At LaDUE's Grocery and Restaurant you will find anything and everything you need in the grocery line, and Ed. will be there to wait on you.

 

April 10, 1886

Women sufferage [sic] advocates point to the fact that there are twenty-three United States Senators now in favor of movement.  Three years ago there were two.

 

April 10, 1886

The G.A.R. Grand March by Wiegand is certainly the most brilliant and fascinating little march on record.  Price 40cts. Igu. Fischer, Publisher, Toledo, Ohio.

 

April 10, 1886

Elections here and around us seem to be hotly contested this year.  Good candidates for the offices were brought out and being in the hands of their friends the friends fought their battles mantully [sic].

 

April 10, 1886

The roads – well, the less you say about them the better, we for one don’t feel competent with the language we have at our disposal to do the subject justice.  Our readers can use what adjectives they choose, we will remain passive.

 

April 10, 1886

The people of this vicinity as well as the members of the W.C.T.U. were greatly disappointed in not being able to listen to Mrs. C.A. WOOD, president of the above society of this county, last Sabbath morning.  Word reached here Saturday that owing to illness she could not fulfill her engagement.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. Joe PINKLEY, Station agent at this place, informs us that from April 6th to the 23rd inst. he will sell round tickets to Chicago at one and one-third fare, limited retiring coupon to four days from date of sale.  Here is a chance for a cheap ride to Chicago and return and an opportunity to attend the Citrus Fair.

 

April 10, 1886

Let us say a word to you.  If you are looking for Wall Paper, you will find it to your interest to call at CAIN & PINKLEY's Drug Store, and look at their mammoth Stock.  It is full and complete in every particular.   They are selling large quantities and the goods recommend themselves, and the prices are right down to bed rock.

 

April 10, 1886

Mrs. Andrew KEISER, now of Prophetstown, was in this city Thursday last.

 

April 10, 1886

Frank M. PALMER took the train for Chicago Thursday morning.  Business called him to the city.

 

April 10, 1886

The Bonton is the place for a good square lunch or a dish of oysters.  E.B. CUMMINGS, Prop.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. Owen COLLINS has moved back into his house east of town, located near the railroad.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. HERBERT and Miss Florence GRISWOLD took the train, Tuesday, for Normal, Ill., where they go to attend college.

 

April 10, 1886

Elder STRINGER will preach his fourth sermon in his series to the young next Sunday evening.  Subject John B. GOUGH.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. Harry RADCLIFFE, of the Bureau County News, of Princeton, illuminated the Tornado sanctum one day this week.  Sorry we were out.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. Chas. WEST and wife spent a week visiting with Mrs. WEST's uncle and family in Davenport, Iowa.  They returned home Thursday.

 

April 10, 1886

A.S. BREWER brought a basket of fine nice apples to our office last Tuesday.  We, and the little GIFFORD’s, heartily appreciate his generous gift.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. Eric BROWN, of Prophetstown, made the Tornado office a call last Thursday.  He was here to have FARLEY gaze at him through the camera.

 

April 10, 1886

Hon. J. FINCH, Right Worthy Grand Templer, has set apart April 11th to be observed by Good Templer lodges a memorial day for J.B. GOUGH.

 

April 10, 1886

The election in Hume resulted in Wm. RAWSON being elected Supervisorl; E.D. JACKSON, Town Clerk; Geo. ELY, Collector; Aaron POPE Commissioner of Highways.

 

April 10, 1886

If you want to buy fine Dress Goods by sample.  Go to STILSON's for there you will find them.  He keeps on hand the best Standard Dry Goods, Groceries, Boots and Shoes at low prices.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. James LEAHY was elected his own successor for the office of Commissioner of Highways of Hahnaman Tuesday.  He has held that office for years and it is hard to find a man popular enough to defeat him at the polls.

 

April 10, 1886

After the services at the Baptist Church last Thursday, the members held a business meeting and it was decided to give Rev. D.H. GRIGGS a call.  He will preach here half of the time and at Erie the other half, making his residence here.

 

April 10, 1886

Mr. A.T. GLASSBURN and family returned from their trip to Iowa last Tuesday.  Mr. G. reports that they are having fine weather there, that the roads are dusty and Mr. HOVEY renews his invitation, given at the depot here when he left, for the Tampico folks to call and see hm.

 

April 10, 1886

In Supervisor BREWER’s report, published in our last week’s issue there was an error.  In some way the figures were transposed making the amount of the dog tax $95.58 when it should have been $69.58.  We noticed the mistake and corrected it; but there were few papers sent out before the change was made.

 

April 10, 1886

Are you going to buy a new dress?  If so you want to visit J.K. CHESTER’s Sterling, for he has a splendid assortment of All Wool Boucles, All Wool Etamines, Gilbert Suitings, Noreity Suitings, Satin Berbers, new shades in Cashmeres, new shades in Henrietta Clothes, new shades in Tricuts, new shades in cheap Dry Goods.  Go see them.

 

April 10, 1886

Another Irish victory for Hahnaman.  The Knights of Labor to the front.  So cometh the report from our neighbors.  The election was a one sided affair as Ed. DEVINE was elected without oppositional; R. DAVIS, Town Clerk; John McCABE, Assessor; M.J. DURR, Collector;  James LEAHY, Com. of Highways; Henry FLUCK, School Trustee long term and J.C. REEVES, to fill vacancy; J. CONNOLLY for Constable.

 

April 10, 1886

The Knights of Labor propose to inaugurate ware upon liquor dring [sic], and not on any moral or sentimental grounds, but on purely business principles.  The man who does not use liquor, they argue, will be less likely to commit rash and violent acts.  Moreover, his employing will not have his drinking habits as an excuse for getting rid of him, and will listen to his grievances more respectfully if  he is a man of sobriety and good habits.  A man who drinks, is a slave to his employer, and defeats him in the contest with that employer.

 

April 10, 1886

ELECTION

[article not legible enough to copy]

Below we give the results of the vote:

For Supervisor,

Ed. D. GRISWOLD - 115

Auren S. BREWER - 69

For Town Clerk,

George B. JACKSON - 113

Thomas O. STEADMAN - 69

For Assessor,

Job E. GREENMAN - 100

Charles R. ALDRICH - 86

For Collector,

George H. LUTYENS - 182

For Commisioner of Highways,

Oliver OLSSON - 111

James BROWN - 74

For School Trustee,

Nicholas LUTYENS - 183

For pathmaster 8 Road Dist. - 119

 

At the election at Fairfield township, Bureau Co., Ill, on Tuesday last there were two fall tickets in the field, the result of which we give below.

For Supervisor,

L.W. BROWN - 79

G.W. BERGE - 49

For Town Clerk,

M.R. THACKABERRY - 69

W.C. JONES - 59

For Assessor,

Robert McKENZIE - 70

Wm. RUCK - 50

For Collector,

George PETERSON - 67

Theodore BERGE - 59

For Commissioner of Highways,

George BURDEN - 67

Rarmus JOHNSON - 60

For School Trustee,

H.M. HARRIS - 66

Adam STIVER - 60

For the Appropriation - 3

Against the Appropriation - 128

 

April 10, 1886

Three Territories are knocking at the doors of Congress for admission as States – Dakota, Montana and Washington.

 

April 10, 1886

Ninety-one millions [sic] of whitefish will soon be placed in the great lakes by the Government – 30,000,000 in Lake Michigan, 9,000,000 in Lake Superior, 21,000,000 in Lake Huron, 18,000,000 in Lake Erie and 13,000,000 in Lake Ontario.

 

April 10, 1886

Gold was discovered in the south of France.

 

April 10, 1886

 

 

April 10, 1886

Recipes

Apple Jelly:  Two quarts of water to one dozen apples, pare and slice, then boil soft and strain through a flannel-bag.  To one pint of juice add one pound of loaf sugar and the juice of one lemon.  Boil fifteen minutes, putting in the lemon peel and strain again - Exchange.

Waffles:  Three eggs - white and yolks beaten separately, one tablespoonful of butter, or a piece the size of a hen's egg, half a teaspoonful of soda, or a teaspoonful of baking powder, a pinch of salt, on quart of flour.  Mix all together with sour cream enough to make a batter; cook in waffle iron over the coals of fire until of a light brown color. - The Household.

Beef Cakes:  Take some rare-cooked, cold roast beef and mince it very fine; then boil and mash some white potatoes and add them to the meat, making a mixture three-fourths meet and one-fourth potatoes.  Now add a couple of sprigs of parsley, minced fine, mix all well together and bind it with the beaten yolk of an egg.  Form the mixture into cakes about as big round as a teacup, dredge them with flour, and fry until nicely browned in hot beef-drippings.  When done serve garnished with fried parsley - Toledo Blade.

 

April 10, 1886

DIED BROWN - At her home, four and one half miles south of Tampico, on Sunday, April 4th, 1886, Rhoda, wife of Benjamin BROWN, aged seventy-seven years, eleven months and three days.

Mrs. BROWN was born in Hebron, Washington Co., N.Y. May 1st 1808. She married Mr. BROWN, at the above named place November 1853.  They were among the first settlers in Fairfield Township, Bureau Co., Ill., and therefore had a large circle of friends.  The funeral took place on Monday, which was largely attended not withstanding that the roads were exceedingly bad.  The services were held in the Yorktown school house conducted by Elder STRINGER.

 

May 1, 1886

Many of our citizens have their gardens planted.

 

May 1, 1886

JACKSON is studying and practicing phrenology.

 

May 1, 1886

Money to loan on farms, by J.W. WHITE, Tampico

 

May 1, 1886

Fred W. SMITH is building a new kitchen to his residence.

 

May 1, 1886

John HOPKINS, of Leon, removed to Comanche County, Kansas.

 

May 1, 1886

Wall Paper, all the leading patterns and shades at CAIN & PINKLEY’s.

 

May 1, 1886

Frank LEE has gone to make it his home with an aunt near Milledgeville.

 

May 1, 1886

Isaac RAWSON was upon our streets with his fine white stallion, Wednesday.

 

May 1, 1886

Potatoes, Flour, Fish, Canned Goods, and Fancy Groceries, at LaDUE’s Grocery.

 

May 1, 1886

Joseph KEMP is at work this week repairing the interior of J. W. [John, wife is Olive] GLASSBURN & Son's [J.W.'s son is John E.] elevator.

 

May 1, 1886

DIED BROWN-At home, three miles southwest of Yorktown, Tuesday, April 29th, 1886, Labina, wife of Kirk BROWN, aged 81 years, 8 months, and 15 days.  Mrs. BROWN was born in Ohio in 1812, she was married to Mr. BROWN October 8, 1846.  The came to this stage about thirty years ago. During the last two years deceased has suffered greatly from the effects of a tumor, which caused her death.  The funeral took place, at the house, on the 22nd last; services were conducted by Rev. STRINGER.

 

May 1, 1886

VanBIBBER was his own boss at Mr. Robt. COLLINS' blacksmith shop this week.

 

May 1, 1886

Ed WHITE is putting a picket fence in front of his residence on Lincoln street.

 

May 1, 1886

A very heavy rain storm visited this vicinity last Saturday about 6 o’clock p.m.

 

May 1, 1886

A.T. Glassburn is having the interior of his residence painted.  Geo. W. WINTER is doing the work.

 

May 1, 1886

Mr. Joseph KEMP is at work this week repairing the interior of J.W. GLASSBURN & Son’s elevator.

 

May 1, 1886

J.K. CHESTER, of Sterling, is showing the best assortment of Black and Colored Silks to be found in Whiteside County.

 

May 1, 1886

Fresh Canned Goods at he Bonton.  Fresh bread and seasonable fruits always in stock.  E.B. CUMMINGS.

 

May 1, 1886

The largest stock of Wall Paper, Borderings, Window Shades, Etc., in town is at CAIN & PINKLEY’s Drug Store.

 

May 1, 1886

Messrs. J.W. WHITE and A.E. JACOBS are engaged building wire fences on their property two miles northeast of Tampico.

 

May 1, 1886

The weather was very cool last Monday, when compared to what it had been for the previous week.

 

May 1, 1886

Chas. CLARK, of  Sterling, requests you to visit him when in need of anything in the gent’s furnishing line.

 

May 1, 1886

Supervisor El. [sic] D. GRISWOLD picked his grip and started for Morrison, Monday last to attend a meeting of the Board of Supervisors.

 

May 1, 1886

Garden “Sass” is peeping forth from the ground.  Next thing you know Mr. SHERE will drive around in his wagon filled with early vegetables.

 

May 1, 1886

We understand that John RENNER has been elected Treasurer of the Road Commissioners of Hahnaman.  Well, John will make an efficient officer.

 

May 1, 1886

Mr. Joseph RAYNER, one of our southern, industrious and frugal farmers, called at the Tornado office and deposited $1.50 with us for more Tonradoes [sic].

 

May 1, 1886

Miss Jennie SIMMONS, of Rochester, N.Y., is at present visiting her sister, Mrs. B.E. LaDUE, of this place.  MIss SIMMONS, we understand, has been engaged to teach the BREWER school.

 

May 1, 1886

The exterior of the new addition to the Tampico House is receiving a new coat of paint at the hands of Geo. JOHNSON.  McNAUGHTON, himself is bossing the work.

 

May 1, 1886

Emmitt CUMMINGS just knocked the bottom out of prices by selling oranges at 25 cents per dozen.  He says there will be business done at the Bonton, regardless of whether he makes a prophet or not.

 

May 1, 1886

The Village Board of Trustees at their meeting last week swore in the newly elected members, and elected Frank M. PALMER as President.  The Board will hold its regular monthly meeting next Monday night, at which time the standing committees and officers will be appointed.

 

May 1, 1886

Delos CRADDOCK showed us a fine photograph of his groupe [sic] of four Imported Percheron [sic] Norman Stallions that Mr. FARLEY had taken for him.

 

May 1, 1886

FARLEY, the photographer, is making arrangements to move away and requests all parties having cabinets with him call immediately and get them.

 

May 1, 1886

Street Commissioner, CUMMINGS, is doing good work in repairing and replacing old side walks by new ones.  On Lincoln and Cherry streets hs work has been well done.

 

May 1, 1886

John GLASSBURN has moved into his new house.  PALMER, who had the contract of furnishing the furniture, was busy most of last week in getting the furniture ready and putting it into the house.

 

May 1, 1886

It is reported that Will. HILL has been taken to Morrison on a charge of stealing $350 from his sister, who was stopping at his home, in Prophetstown, at the time. It is further reported that he has confessed of the crime.

 

May 1, 1886

Mr. A.D. HILL was reelected Village Clerk of Prophetstown at the last corporation election.  For a newspaper man Mr. HILL is very popular; is appreciated by the people, as is evident by his reelection to such an office of honor and trust.

 

May 1, 1886

John WIEGAND’s G.A.R. Grand March is one of those really good Marches that is full of “go and dash,” one of those airs which compel you to keep time when you hear it.  Just the thing as an opening piece for Grand Army Reunions, Price 40 cts., Piano Duet 75 cts.  Ign. FISHER, Publisher, Toledo, Ohio.

 

May 1, 1886

The Chicago Times scores President CLEVELAND very hard and unfeeling for his recommendating class legislation for the benefit of strikes or strikers.  And, in closing suggests that his clemency give the farmers a little of that sort of legislation, for they truly feel the oppression of monopolies; yet they have never struck or destroyed the property of others.

 

May 1, 1886

On and after May 1st, the C.B.&Q.R.R. will put on sale round trip excursion tickets to Denver, Colorado Springs and Pueblo.  These tickets are good going west for fifteen days from date of  sale, and to return until October 31st, 1886.  Round trip tickets, limited as above, are also for sale at low rates, via this route, to Las Vegas, Hot Springs and other prominent tourist’s points.  For tickets, rates and general information inquire of the agent at the C.B.&Q.R.R. station.

 

May 1, 1886

Garrett HENRIKEN’s house come near being devoured by King Fire last week Friday.  His daughters were engaged planting flowers in the front yard, when one of them thought she smelt [sic] something buring [sic], and on looking towards the house discovered the roof to be on fire.  Two of the girls started toward the house to do what they could to put out the fire, while the other one started for the field to notify her father.  Mr. HENRIKEN saw his daughter coming and expecting all was not right, unharnessed one of the horses, he was working, mounted it and rode to the house.  On arriving there found the girls, with the aid of water and salt, had subdued the fire.  Upon investigation it was found but little damage had been done; but had it not been for the thoughtfulness and timely assistance of the girls it is hard to predict where the fire might have reached or the damage that would have resulted had not its progress been arrested as it was.  The house was insured in the Home of New York, M.G. LOVE agent.  Mr. LOVE presented himself on Saturday and satisfactorily adjusted the loss.

 

May 1, 1886

DIED BROWN-At home, three miles southwest of Yorktown, Tuesday, April 29th, 1886, Labina, wife of Kirk BROWN, aged 81 years, 8 months, and 15 days.  Mrs. BROWN was born in Ohio in 1812 (1824?), she was married to Mr. BROWN October 8, 1846.  They came to this stage about thirty years ago. During the last two years deceased has suffered greatly from the effects of a tumor, which caused her death.  The funeral took place, at the house, on the 22nd last; services were conducted by Rev. STRINGER.

 

May 1, 1886

DIED. CHAMBERS - At her home in Tampico, Friday, April 23rd, 1886, Mrs. Margaret CHAMBERS: aged 67 years.

Mrs. CHAMBERS (better known as Mrs. WARREN) was apparently in moderate health, indeed she had worked hard in the garden all day on Friday, teh above date, and made calls in the evening.  She remarked once that day that she had not felt so well for years.  On Saturday morning teh little girl who slept with her, but who, for some reason, had been excused that night, came in and found her lying on the floor; she at once made an alarm and Mr. METCALF came and found that the old lady was dead, and it was thought that she must havedied about eleven o'clock the previous night.

The Coroner was notified and arrived here a little after noon and impanneled a jury consisting of the followiing gentlemen:  Dr. A.C. SMITH, Alf. SMITH, G.F. ALLEN, E. FARLEY, J.F. LEONARD and M.L. WASHBURNE, from whose deliberations the follwoing verdict was arrived at, that death was caused by "Failure of the heart's action, caused by valvular disease of the heart."

Mrs. CHAMBERS was an honest, quiet and hard working woman, and her sudden death caused much excitement and sorrow.  A short service was held at the house on Monday morning, conducted by Rev. F. STRINGER, after which the body was taken to Walnut for internment.

 

May 1, 1886
DIED - WHITE.  Three miles southwest of town, Saturday, April 24th, 1886, infant child of Adelbert and Carrie S. WHITE.

A short service was held at the house, on Sunday morning, 25th last, conducted by Rev. F. STRINGER.

 

May 1, 1886

DIED - BLACK. Six miles southwest of Tampico, Sunday, April 25th, 1886, Bishop BLACK, aged 28 years, 7 months, 8 days.  Mr. BLACK was born in Williamstown, Mass.  His parents came to this state in 1856.  When a boy Bishop had an attack of brain fever which so shattered his nervous system that it was never able to rally, and he died of complete exhaustion of the vital forces and nervous system.  His funeral took place on the 27th last, services at the Union School House, four miles west and two miles south of town, conducted by Rev. F. STRINGER.

 

May 1, 1886

Dissolution Notice

The co-partnership heretofore existing under the firm name and style of PAICE & WASHBURNE, is this day dissolved by mutual consent.  Mr. WASHBURNE retiring, Mr. PAICE continuing.  All accounts due the firm are to be settled with Mr. PAICE, who will also pay all bills against the firm.

J.C. PAICE

W.L. WASHBURNE

 

May 1, 1886

Sour Sauce:  One tablespoonful of flour, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, one teaspoonful of butter or grease, and one tablespoonful of vinegar.  Season to tast, nutmeg is best, and stir till smooth, then pour on boiling water to right consistency and let

it come to a boil. - The Household.

 

May 1, 1886

Steam Pudding:  Take one egg, one-half cup of sugar, one tablespoonful of melted butter or meat fryings, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder and a pinch of salt and stir well together, then add one cup of cold water and one-half cup of dried fruit or raisens, and thicken some stiffer than cake.  Mix it in the dish and you cool it in and steam one and one-half hours.  Have the water boiling all the time, and don't take off the steamer or lift the lid. - The Caterer.

 

May 8, 1886

Now that John GLASSBURN has got his old house off his premises his new house shows off with good effect from Main street.

 

May 8, 1886

Frank FRY, an employee of the Keystone, had his index finger of his right hand taken off while monkeying with a buzz saw Monday.

 

May 8, 1886

Mr. Charles BROWN, who for a number of years has been a member of the firm FREGOE & BROWN, engaged in the drive will business, has sold his interest in the business to William A. LUTYENS.

 

May 8, 1886

Mr. O.D. PITNEY, who carries on the HOLMES' farm, a few miles southwest of here, was in town last week Friday.   He made the Tornado a call and renewed the subscriptions for his sons, Fred and James before bidding us good day.

 

May 8, 1886

Mr. W.I. COLLINS, representing the COLLINS Marble Works of Fulton, was in his place last Monday and placed in the Tampico Cemetery a 7 foot, draped spire, Italian marble monument at the head of the grave of Charley, son of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. RUCK.

 

May 8, 1886

Miss Allie GRAY commenced her school, in the WINCHELL district, last Monday.  Mis GRAY is said to be a good teacher and, undoubtedly, give entire satisfaction to patrons and pupils.

 

May 8, 1886

Abram MYERS and Ed. LaDUE the school book and school supplies agent of this place, have taken the road and are skirmishing around country school districts for orders.

 

May 8, 1886

T.O. STEADMAN, Lodge Deputy, of teh I.O.G.T. assisted by Jennie MAXFIELD and Agnes GIFFORD, installed the following officers last Tuesday night, viz:  F. STRINGER, W.C.T.; Anna McNAMARA, W.V.T.; Bert JACOBS, P.W.C.T.; Jennie MAXWELL, W.S.; Ed. WAHL, W.F.S.; Mary SANDERS, W.T.; Capt. MAXFIELD, W.M.; Maggie SANDERS, W.I.G.; Claude LOVE, W.O.S., Eva SMITH, S.C.; DeEtte BUROUGHS, W.R.H.S.; Maggie McNAUGHTON, W.L.H.S.; Ina SMITH, W.A.S; Fred GLASSBURN, W.D.M.

 

May 8, 1886

Chicken Pudding:  Cut up the chicken in large pieces, and put them in a sauce-pan with seasoning, celeray, parsley, and as little water as will cook them; let them simmer until tender; then take the chicken from the water and place it in a deep baking dish; pour the patter made with milk, flour and eggs over all, and bake it.  - Western Rural.

 

May 8, 1886

Rich Griddle Cake:  Put a half pound of flour into a bowl, add three ounces of butter and a little salt.  Rub all together with the back of a spoon; when well mixed add as much rich milk as will form a light paste:  roll it out, but touch it as little as possible, to half an inch in thickness.  The griddle must be heated thoroughly - but not too hot - and mus be greased, but no oil swimming on it.  Place the cake upon it, and take it twenty minutes turning it once or twice. - Exchange.

 

May 8, 1886

A Sweet Dish:  Boil some rice quite soft, and when it is dry  mix it with a boiled custard of three eggs and a pint of milk flavored with vanilla; maraschino may be added.  Add a little stwed fruit or jam and half a pint of whipped cream.  Mix thoroughly, pour it into a mold, set in the ice until quite firm and then turn it into a dish and serve. - Exchange.

 

May 8, 1886

ORIGIN OF TEH TERM "BOYCOTT."

The term "Boycott" is now very much used and in answer to a question from a subscriber, as to the origin of teh term, the Lancaster (Pa.) New Era gives the following explanaition:  An Irish land proprietor namend Captain Boycott several years ago excited the anger of his tenanats and of the other tenatnst nad laborers of his district by some action, and the consequence was that his tenants refused to gather his crops and would allow no one else to do so.  The aid of the law was invoked and a posse of constables as guards about the place finally enabled teh harvestiong ffo be done.  The affair attracted great attention throughout Ireland and when other troubles took place in that unhappy country the pleasuresid of the working classes was directed against a landed propreitor or a manufacturer to his loss or discomfort, we was said to be "boycotted."  To "boycott" now means simply to refuse to purchase from obnoxious tradesmen and manufacturers, or to refuse to work for them or allow others to do so.  Organized boycotting is done by trades unions, etc, in order to compel those boycotted to agree to certain terms demaned by tthose doing the boycotting."

 

May 8, 1886

Mr. O. D. [Owen] PITNEY, who carries on the HOLMES' farm, a few miles southwest of here, was in town last Friday.  He made the Tornado a call and renewed the subscription for his sons, Fred and James, before bidding us good day.

 

May 8, 1886

FABRY's COMET

The following in reference to Fabry's Comet, we clip from the Clinton Herald:

This comet, which was discovered in Paris on the second of last December [December 2, 1885], by Fabry, is now rapidly increasing in brightness, and can be seen by the naked eye when the attention is directed to the place through it is not yet of sufficient brilliance to attract attention.  A very small telescope or spy glass or even a strong operaglass, will, however, be sufficient to show it very nicely.  It now presents a tail nearly two degrees in length and has a star-like nucleus of about the seventh magnitude.  The proper time to look for it is between three and four o'clock in the morning, for by the time it is dark enough in the evening to be seen it has sunk beneath the horizon.  Between these hours it may be found in the following manner by any one at all familiar with stars:  From the North Star draw in imagination a straight line through upper of the four bright stars in Cassiopeia, and continue this line about fifteen degrees further, when three moderately light stars will be seen.  Near to these, a trilve [sic] south, the comet will be found shining with a faint, nebulous light.  By the close of the month it will then be a very conspicuous object in the early morning hours, exhibiting a tail probably fifteen or twenty degrees in length.  After this its beauty will rapidly wane, and by the close of May it will have passed from view.

 

May 15, 1886

In the grave yard south of town there are excavations caused by the removal of remains to the new cemetery.  We have spoken of this matter before and at the time thought that further notice would be unnecessary and that the excavations would be promptly filled by the friends.  Thus far nothing has been done and if the matter is not attended to soon by the friends the authorities ought take the matter in hand and have the work done before the hot weather sets in.

 

May 15, 1886

The Boston has hung out its Ice Cream sign.  Emmitt don't propose to be behind in such matters.

 

May 15, 1886

Fresh Canned Goods at the Boston.  Fresh bread and seasonable fruits always in stock.  E.B. CUMMINGS

 

May 15, 1886

Choice Fresh Family Groceries are always to be found at LaDUE's Grocery.

 

May 15, 1886

At the end of council meeting, T.A. GLASSBURN was appointed Village Treasurer, H. CUMMINGS, Street Commissioner and T.A. SANDERS, Police Constable.

 

May 15, 1886

ALLEN & HUMPHREY is the name of our new Pump Firm.  These gentlemen are ready to supply you with a new pump, move or repair your old ones.  They keep on hadn all kind of repairs, iron and wooden pumps and pipe and will do your work in an [sic] workman like manner and on short notice.

 

May 15, 1886

Herbert BROWN has his hands fullof business in attending to and overseeing the workmen engaged in fixing up his house and residence on Market street.

 

May 15, 1886

That new fence in front of the Warren HIXSON old residence, on Market street, is a substantial one to say the least; but being substantial, at the same time it is very uncouth and unpleasant to look at.  It is made of barb wire and being close to the sidewalk will prove disastrous to the ladies dresses on a breezy day, unless they take to the street when passing.  In Sterling and many other towns the authorities will not allow fences made of barb wire to be built or stand upon the public thoroughfare and it would be well for our town to pass a similar law.

 

May 15, 1886

Mr. F. G. DANIELS, representing the Wilson Bros., manufacturers of the Aetna Fire Engine, of Clinton, Ia., was in town Thrusday.  He confided with the President of the Village Board in view of selling one of his engines for fire porposes [sic].  The engine is said to throw a three-fourth inch stream 75 feet, or a one-half inch stream 100 feet, and costs but $200.00 to $250.00.  This town needs something of that kind for protection in case of fire.  What think you of the matter?  Talk the question over.  Agitate it and let's find out if we need such protection.

 

May 22, 1886

Miss Luna DENISON is teaching in the LUTYENS district.

 

May 22, 1886

Sam ADAMS has been going around with his hand bandaged of late.  He had the misfortune to try to run his hand between the cog wheels of a wind mill.

 

May 22, 1886

Mrs. COURTRIGHT, of Kendall county, Ill., is making her brother, Mr. N. LUTYENS, who resides a few miles south west of town, a visit.

 

May 22, 1886

Nettie, eldest daughter of Prof., F.S. JOHNSON, was taken ill with fever Saturday.  At present writing she is reported as somewhat better and her speedy recovery is looked for.

 

May 22, 1886

We received a letter from Rev. H.A. SMITH, of Clinton, Wis., this week.  The letter was written in California, where he is spending a few month's vacation resting and visiting his parents.  He writes that they are experiencing hot weather, enjoying beautiful flowers and feasting upon delicious fruit which is very plenty there.

 

May 22, 1886

Ed. A. WORRELL was quite seriously injured, at Morrison, Monday, by the running away of the team he was driving.  He was thrown from the vehicle and had several of his ribs broken, his head and hand bruised and when picked up was insensible.  At last account he was reported to be doing as well as the circumstances would admit.

 

May 22, 1886

Mr. Oliver OLSSON is having a new barn built upon his premises three miles south west of town.  Mr. METCALF has the contract and began work last Monday.

 

May 22, 1886

Notwithstanding the fact ath the farmers are very busy at this time of the year, there is one occassionally who remembers ye editor, as the following list of renewals will prove:  Geo., RUCK, S. M. ESTABROOK, James BROWNE, William METCALF, H BRECKENRIDGE.

 

May 22, 1886

Owing to the inlemency of the weather last week Friday, the meeting ot the W.C.T.U. that was to take place at teh residence of Mrs. C.F. GIFFORD was postponed until Friday afternoon, May 28th, when it will be held at the above stated place.

 

May 22, 1886

M. Joseph KEMP and Mor. ROBINSON took the freight train for Clinton, Iowa, Monday, where they go to work at their trade, carpentering.  They are experienced and skilled mechanics and will no doubt have but little trouble in finding work.

 

May 22, 1886

Mr. D.L. BURROUGHS accompanied by his family and his two sisters, who have been guests at his house for several weeks, started for Woodard's Bluff Friday afternoon, where they will visit with Mr. Jno. RICHARDS and family until Tuesday next.

 

May 22, 1886

Mr. Wm. WYLIE, who is making Bradford, Ill., his home, was in our city a few days this week visiting his parents and friends.  Will is looking well and seems to be enjoying the bright side of life.

 

May 22, 1886

Mr. W. Glenn REEVE, and family, of Peru, Ill., and Mr. S.R. HOVEY and wife, of Independance, Iowa, are guests ofd the GLASSBURN mansion.  The children are now all at home, to help "pa" warm his new house.

 

May 22, 1886

John GRAY showed us a curious freak of nature in the shape of a four legged chicken.

 

May 29, 1886

Mrs. Alf. SMITH received sad news Wednesday, of the death of her sister, Mrs. D. HOWELL, of Lansing, Mich. who died Saturday last, of dropsy.

 

May 29, 1886

The Woodmen [MWA] of Fairfield are to build a new hall.  They are undecided whetherr to erect it in Yorktown Cornders or on KNOWLTON's Hill in Fairfield Center.

 

May 29, 1886

J.E. GREENMAN, our Assessor has received his books and has began [sic] his canvas of the township to assess the real and personal property.

 

May 29, 1886

There is a number of our citizens who are making a practice of staking their cows and horses upon the streets to graze.  We don't just admire suc proceedings; but we suppose we can stand it if the rest can.  If there is no law against such things we see no good reason why we and other should pasture our stock while our neighbor is allowed free use of the street for his animals to feed upon.

 

May 29, 1886

President of the Village Board, F.M. PALMER, bought a cow last week Friday.  He led her home from near WHITTINGTON's farm some nine miles south of here.

 

May 29, 1886

Mr. KEMP [Joe] returned from his prospecting tour last Friday.  He was away four days and visited Clinton, Iowa, Savanna, Coleta, Milledgville, Ill.  He reports as finding business in the carpentering line very quiet everywhere he went, and says there is about as much if not more being done in and around Tampico, in proportion to the size of the place and the number of workmen, as anywhere.

 

May 29, 1886

PICNIC

Last Saturday, Mr. George BERGE, teacher of the Sodtown school, held a picnic and invited the Fairfield Center school and teacher to join him also the school over which Miss Ida BANES rules with gentle dignity.  The Center teacher Miss Jennie DEITS took nearly all of her school with her and though the youngest teacher we were all proud of her.  All schools did their teachers great credit in recitation, declamations, singing and deportment.

Lemonade was freely given by Mr. G. BERGE, while a sumptuous dinner was served by the ladies.  We were all well pleased by Rev. Mr. STRINGER in his short speech which filled the children's heart with glee, as his illustrations and anecdotes will long be remembered by them.  One little by said "Mamma, I know he is a good man, for he and his wife are so happy looking."

There is no sight more pleasant than large shade trees with their wealth of shadows thrown over a grass plot dotted with pretty children.

Mr. BERGE did us all a favor when he generously invited us to share with hime this first picnic of the season.

 

May 29, 1886

Mr. N. DIRDINGER, our Harness Maker, has just received a large invoice of Whips.  We were in his shop Wednesday and examined his stock, and know whereof we speak when we say he has a large and well selected supply, from which any one can be suited, and as to price he has them marked very low, within the reach of all.  Go take a look at them.

 

May 29, 1886

Clydesdale Stallion, Blooming Heather, will make the season of 1886, at ALDRICH's stale, Tampico, Mondays and Tuesdays; Hume Center, Wednesdays and Thursdays; and at STROCK's feed sheds, Sterling, Fridays and Saturdays.  Terms: - to insure a foal, $15.  Season mares $12.  All persons moving from fthe country or disposing of mares before foaling must pay insurance.  N. WILLIAMS & Son, Prop.  N.P. WILLIAMS, Keeper.

 

May 29, 1886

MARRIED

LAWTON-SEELY - At the residence of the bride's parents, in Portland, Thursday, May 20th, 1886, by Rev. A.M. EARLY, of Erie, Mr. F.L. LAWTON, of Morrison, and Miss Jennie L. SEELY, of Portland.

 

June 5, 1886

We report the names of Frank LEE, Mrs. Margaret DOW, W. WINSLOW, A. KEISER, John H. JOHNSON, as among the list of new subs and renewals for this week.

 

June 5, 1886

Mr. S.A. MINGLE, wife and children, of Rock Falls, were guests of Mr. Ed. MACOMBER and E. A. EMMONS over Sunday last.  Monday Mr. MINGLE made the Tornado office a pleasant call.

 

June 5, 1886

Mr. D. McMILLEN and family took the western train Saturday noon for Lyndon, where they arrived in time to attend the services afther the decoration parade.  They remained a guest of Mrs. PATTERSON, Mrs. McMILLEN's mother, until Monday, when Mr. D. returned home leaving his family to continue their visit.

 

June 5, 1886

Messrs. T.M. WYLIE, J.L. WYLIE and A.W. ARNOLD attended the auction sale of trotting horses held in Princeton Thursday.

 

June 12, 1886

Mrs. James BAKER, of Clinton, Iowa, is at present a guest of her neice, Mrs. C.F. GIFFORD, of Tampico, Ill.

 

June 12, 1886

Nelson HINKSTON, of New Bedford, died at his home Thursday morning, June 10th, 1886, of choleramorbus.  Mr. HINKSTON, was an old resident of Bureau Co., and was about 60 years of age.  His remains were embalmed and will be sent to Ohio for burial.

 

June 12, 1886

James BROWN became a Woodman last Wednesday night, and J.F. LEONARD, J.C. PAICE, Jesse VanBIBBER, Job E. GREENMAN, G.D. McKEAN and Firth STRINGER, were elected candidates for membership of the Tampico Camp No. 9.

 

June 12, 1886

Rev. C.C. SINK and his two daughters, of Prophetstown, made our village a visit Monday.  They gave the Torndado office a call; but finding us gone, they repaired to the ice cream saloon (the next best place to get cooled off) and sipped the delicious nectar while resting and discussing the question as where to go next.

 

June 12, 1886

GLASS BALL SHOOT

The Prophestown Gun Club visited Tampico  last Thursday and engaged in a friendly glass ball shoot with our boys.

 

June 12, 1886

Report of school in District No. 10, for the month ending June 2nd, 1886.  Number enrolled, 18; minutes lost by tardiness, 30; number of visitors, 3; Pupils on the Roll of Honor, Nate WINCHELL, Foster WINCHELL, Burt McGRADY, Charlie SHAW, Nellie MOSIER, Ethel WEST, Willie BLACK, Frank BLACK, Sadie BOGART, Charlie KELLETT, Anna NEEDHAM and Grace NEEDHAM.  A.M. GRAY, Teacher.

 

 

 

 

June 12, 1886

WARNING

All persons are hereby warned not to tie, hitch, or secure in any way, any horses, mules, or cattle, of whatsoever age, to any stake, tree, chunk or sidewalk, in the Village of Tampico, for the purpose of pasturing the Public Highways, as it is contrary to the Statue of Illinois, and all parties liable from this time forward will be dealt with according to law.  Per order Village Trustees.

F.H. [Frank] KNOX, Village Clerk

 

June 19, 1886

President CLEVELAND will unveil the Bartholdi Statue of Liberty, about September 1st, 1886.  People from every part of the United States are expected to be present and witness the great event.

 

June 19, 1886

Job GREENMAN, out assessor is right after dogs this year.  He believes if a man can afford to keep a dog he ought to pay the tax upon it.  Believing that it is not everyone who can afford the luxury of supporting a pup.

 

June 19, 1886

The W.C.T.U. will meet next Friday, June 25th, 1886, at the residence of Mr. G.A. STILSON, at 4 p.m.  Ladies are all invited.

 

June 19, 1886

President CLEVELAND will unveil the Bartholdi Statue of Liberty, about September 1st, 1886.  People from every part of the United States are expected to be present and witness the great event.

 

June 19, 1886

Job GREENMAN, our assessor is right after the dogs this year.  He believes if a man can afford to keep a dog he ought to pay the tax upon it.  Believing that it is not everyone who can afford the luxury of supporting  a pup.

 

June 26, 1886

Job GREENMAN, J.F. LEONARD, Firth STRINGER and J.C. PAICE became Woodman last Wednesday.

 

June 26, 1886

Mrs. Wm. TULLER and daughter, of Prophetstown, were guests of Mrs. D.L. BORROUGHS, of this city Wednesday last.

 

June 26, 1886

Alden BOOTH traded off his span of ponies to J.W. GLASSBURN for a couple of Village lots.  Anything for a trade and keep business booming is the characteristics of these gentlemen.

 

June 26, 1886

DIED

PRATT - At her home near PRATT's Station, Whiteside count, Ill., Thursday morning, June 24th, 1886, of fever, Mrs. Eliza PRATT, aged 52 years.  Mrs. PRATT formerly resided in this township.  She is the sister of Mrs. Harlow SMITH and mother of Mr. Ed PRATT, who resides three miles north of here.  The funeral services took place Friday morning at 10.

 

June 26, 1886

Dr. A.C. SMITH and John GLASSBURN went out for a little targe shooting the other day.  John sayus the doctor is a good shot, and that he, himself, had seen the day that he was, and even now he is quite a hand at shooting.  A rifle finds his shoulder just as natural and the ball strikes the mark as accurately now as ever, and the story goes that he beat the doctor though he is too bashful to say so himself.

 

June 26, 1886

Mr. Will LOVE and family, who moved to their farm, a few miles southwest of here, early last spring, have again taken up their abode in their city residence here.  Will says he likes the country, but his business is such as to call him to town most of the time and he wishes to be near his business.  Glad to see you back Will.

 

June 26, 1886

Mrs. Emma MOLLOY was held in $1,000 in Springfield, Mo., Tuesday, to answer such indictments as may be found against her, the indictments in the complicity in the murder of Mrs. GRAHAM and the bigamous marriage of GRAHAM with Cora LEE having been quashed.

 

June 26, 1886

Mr. N. TEACH, of Spring Hill, was in town Sunday last.  Mr. TEACH is engaged in the blacksmith buisness at teh above named place and is doing a large and remunerative busienss.  Glad to hear it for Nute is a young man of sterling worth and ought to succeed.

 

June 26, 1886

Messrs. Robt. COLLINS, Sam and Joe TEACH, Fred ALLEN, Henry GILES and John WILLETT of Tampico took in the excursion to Moline last Wednesday.  Whe the train passed here there were comparitively few passengers on board.

 

June 26, 1886

Rufus ALDRICH purchased a barn of Mrs. FLEMINGS, and was engaged in moving if from her premises, near the M.E. church to his lots on Washington street.

 

June 26, 1886

Albert GLASSBURN who resides about five miles northeast of this palce tells us that during the storm of Wednesday last that there was hail fell with the rain.  The storm made a very large rumbling noise as it approached and he began to think that a young tornado was coming.

 

June 26, 1886

Robt. COLLINS tells us he had a package stolen from him while coming home from the excursion Wednesday night.  The "Peanut boy" took the package and on being questioned says he handed it to a man who got off the cars.  But Robert thinks that that is all a hoax, as teh conductor would not even tell him the boy's name.  Those who were in teh car think the peanut lad gave teh package to a chum and together they are to divide the spoils.

 

June 26, 1886

 

 

June 26, 1886

KNOWLTON's HILL

The dance, on the evening of June 16th, 1886, in the new hall, owned by the Modern Woodmen of Fairfield, was a very pleasant affair.  The hall has not been more than eight or ten days in construction and was not completed; but we found a large room where four sets gracefully glided around without crowding the many spectators to the wall.

The work has been under the supervision of Mr. Frank DRAPER and partner, of New Bedford, and many of the Woodmen have given their work upon the building.

Reports say there will be a dance Monday, July 5th, 1886.  I speak for a full house if that be so, I wish the Woodmen well.  We have long needed a hall in our town and are glad these men have taken hold to it.

Mr. KNOWLTON served lemonade at reasonable rates and Mr. DRAPER and Mr. HOGEBOOM [likely John Noah HOGEBOOM] rendered the music of the evening.  The hall was well lighted, comfortably seated for those that did not dance, and proved a success financially.  Why not try again? A.K.H. [Anna Kedzie HOGEBOOM]

 

June 26, 1886

BUTTER

Butter, Butter, nice and fair;

How I wonder what you are;

Are you really what you seem?

Were you made of grease and cream?

If made of grease, nice and fine,

Your name shall be Oleomargarine.

If with creame [sic], without hair,

You will be butter, nice and fair.

 

July 3, 1886

Miss Mary SMITH, of St. Joseph, Missouri, is at present visiting her brother Dr. A.C. SMITH and family.

 

July 3, 1886

Mr. M. THACKABERRY & SON has bought a fine two year old, full blooded Clydesdale Stallion.  He weighs 1,408 and cost $1,300.

 

The "Clipper" base ball club of this place re-organized last Monday evening.  The club is composed of good players and is a strong nine.

 

July 3, 1886

The toy pistol is now presented to the small boy as the 4th draws near.  No wonder we have anarchists, as the training is commenced when quite young.

 

July 3, 1886

VanBIBBER has begun putting the second coat of paint on his residence on teh east side of Main street.  So far as he has finished, the appearance of the house is materially beautiful.

 

July 3, 1886

Mr. S.W. TEACH has for the past week been unable to do his own work in the butcher shop. He was at the slaughter house butchering a cow the other day and after knocking her down he took out his knife to stick her.  The point of the knife was dull and did not penetrate the hide at his first effort, he made a second thrust and just then the critter struck his arm with her leg, the knife missed its mark and struck his left hand and nearly severing the thumb.  He tied up his hand with a handkerchief, stuck the cow with another knife then went after Abe FORWARD to dress the critter and repaired to town and had the doctor dress his hand.  He is getting along as nicely as can be expected; but it is feared that the thumb will be always stiff and of but little use.

 

July 3, 1886

Word reaches us that I.W. SHELDON, formerly a resident of Yorktown; but now of Devil's Lake, Dak., is doing well farming and this season has 280 acres of wheat and oats the crop is doing finely and bid fair for an abundant harvest.  We are glad to hear of his prospertiy and trust his most sanguine expectations will be realized.

 

July 3, 1886

Improvements still go on here.  Among the improvements we notice that the work of building a brick foundation under the north side of the City Hotel was in progress last week.  I.H. CAIN, the owner of the building, has been superintending the work.

 

July 3, 1886

Mr. C. SMITH of Kankakee, arrived here Tuesday evening, to visit his sons and daughter, Mrs. PALMER , and Mr. Fred and Alf. SMITH.

 

July 10, 1886

Miss Emma SMITH returned Thursday evening from Dakota where she had been visiting her sister, Mrs. Jodie REMINGTON.

 

July 10, 1886

J.C. REEVES, who resides about four miles southwest of here is the first one to report having had sweet corn to eat from his own garden about here.

 

July 10, 1886

We called upon neighbor J.W. WILLETT the other evening and had the pleasure of hearing his daughter Miss Hannah sing.  She has a very sweet and musical voice and though but about ten years old she sings very sweetly and with proper training she will be one of the best if not the best songster in our town.

 

July 10, 1886

Last Saturday about two o'clock, D. M. FORD's house was burned.  While they were at dinner they heard a noise and went out to see what it was and discovered the house on fire.  The fire made such headway that they only saved a few bed clothes, the sewing machine and organ.  His wife and children but one, were in Sterling attending the celebration, and knew nothing of the loss until she returned home.  The loss will be probably about $2,000 partly covered by insurance.

 

July 10, 1886
Report of school, District No. 10, for month ending July 1st, 1886.  Number enrolled, 18; average daily attendance, 16; visitors 5; Roll of honor, May BOGART, Burt. McGRADY, Alta NEEDHAM, Low WINCHELL, Nellie MOSIER, Ethel WEST, Gracie NEEDHAM, Bell BOGART, Foster WINCHELL, Sadie BOGART, Nate WINCHELL, Anna NEEDHAM and Mamie MOSIER.  A.M. GRAY, Teacher.

 

July 10, 1886

The M.E.L.A. Society met at Mr. E.D. GRISWOLD's, Wednesday afternoon.  About fifty persons sat down to supper.  Those who were there report a good tim.  We would like to know if any one ever went to Mr. GRISWOLD's without having a good tim.  The receipts were $3.60.

 

July 10, 1886

DIED

WHITTINGTON-At the residence of J.W. WHITTINGTON, in Allen county, Kansas, Friday, June 25th, 1886, Mrs. Lydia WHITTINGTON, aged, seventy-three years, one month, and twenty five days.

Mrs. WHITTINGTON was born in Carroll county, Ohio, April 30th, 1813.  Her parents had settled in Richland county Ohio in 1817, in which place she married Samuel WHITTINGTON, February 27th, 1838, residing there until April 9th, 1851, when she emigrated to Fairfield Township, Bureau County, Illinois, at which place she resided until the spring of 1882, when they broke up housekeeping and went to visit her sons in Allen County Kansas.  In the fall returned to Illinois to visit her old home.  In the summer of 1884, after returning to Kansas she had an attack of Paralysis, from which she never recovered; but bearing all her affliction with fortitude she continued to visit her children in Illinois, Iowa and Kansas.  Last winter she stayed with her daughter in Iowa, and about five weeks before her death she requested her son J.W. WHITTINGTON to come to Iowa and assister her to Kansas which request he immediately answered, she wished to see all of her children and grand children once more.  She arrived in Kansas much exhausted from which she recovered and had a nice visit with her children and grand children, all being present when she said I now want to die.  She went to sleep and slept for 48 hours in which time she could be aroused, she awoke in a paralytic stroke, called pa three times and expired in less than five minutes.  She was buried in Fairfield Cemetery, a large concourse of mourners and sympathizing friends followed her to the cemetery.  Her husband Samuel WHITTINGTON, survives her and is with their son, J.W. WHITTINGTON, Kincaid, Kansas.

 

July 10, 1886

more recipes

 

 

 

July 10, 1886

FAIRFIELDCENTER

Miss Lulu BROWN spent the 5th of July with her friends Mertie and Minnie HOGEBOOM [daughters of Emmet and Eliza HOGEBOOM - Emmet is John HOGEBOOM's cousin.], it being her birthday, she is 9 years old.  They all spent a pleasant hour with our Fannie under the old shade trees

Mr. Jacob CURLEY, one of our old settlers, celebrated his 72nd birthday July 2nd, may he live to see many more.

Will LANEis improving his house.

Miss Jennie DIETZ closed her school for a six week's vacation; she has proved that a good school can be kept and be well liked by all in the district.

Mr. Jacob KNOWLTON says, the hall is paying well, during the last week they cleared $36, and at the Woodman's dance there were refreshments enough to feed three times the number that was present.  Mr. Robert McKENZIE said he would rather have a bushel too much than have one guest go home hungry, we agree with him. J.H.N. [John Noah HOGEBOOM]

 

July 17, 1886

Lost - On the road between Eli CAIN's and John RENNER's place, a saddle.  A reward of one dollar will be given the finder, by leaving it at the Tornado office or J.C. REEVE's residence.

 

July 17, 1886

A singular accident occurred at Wilton Junction, Iowa, July 5th.  During a private display of fireworks, T.D. FARRIER was sending up rockets, using a chair for support.  The chair fell over and a rocket was deflected from its course.  It struck Joseph ROSS, 19 years old, in the eye, crushing through the head and exploding in the mouth.  ROSS died in two hours.

 

July 17, 1886

Mr. Charles WELCH killed a very large snake on the east side of Main street in front of Father McGLENN's residence, last Wednesday about noon.  He was a big fellow and Charley was determined to kill him, for he spent some little time hunting him in the grass and killing him.

 

July 17, 1886

A new telegraph instrument, called the "Sensophone," has been brought out.  It derives its name from the fact that the message is received on the finger by the sense of touch, instead of by the ear as in the well-known "Sounder."  Otherwise the apparatus is similar to the "Sounder."  Of course, the advantage of the plan is that no sound is heard, and therefore the telegraph is a silent one.  A person may also write down the message with one hand while receiving it on the other.

 

July 17, 1886

Mrs. Tip [H.H.] DOW took the Wednesday morning pass for Minier, Tazewell, Ill to visit her daughter Lornea, and bring Mary, her youngest daughter home.

 

July 24, 1886

Mrs. C.M. WEST and her daughter, Zoe, are at present visiting friends and relatives at Yorktown.

 

July 24, 1886

Mrs. C.W. WELCH's sister of California is at present making Tampico a visit.

 

July 24, 1886

Mrs. MILLER, of Chicago, mother of Mrs. T.S. BEACH, of this city fell dead Saturday afternoon, while playing croquet with her granddaughter Mary BEACH.  Mrs. MILLER had arrived in Morriosn but a few days previous and what promised to be a pleasant visit was brought to a sad termination by her untimely taking off without a moment's notice.  Apoplexy is supposed to have been the cause.  The remains were taken to Chicago Sunday for burial, Sheriff BEACH and family accompaning them.  Whiteside Herald.

 

July 24, 1886

The Tampico Creamery looks much improved since the grass has been cut.  Now if the weeds were cut down and the hedge trimmed along the sidewalk leading to it there would be more cause for praise.  As an old writer says, "We are thankful for large favors, small ones in proportion."

 

July 24, 1886

Oliver OLSSON, our efficient and worthy Commissioner, met us upon the street last Saturday and haniding us $1.50 told us he had threshed his cats and wished us to give him credit for another year's subscription.  We appreciate Oliver's pun and his cash also.

 

July 24, 1886

LOST - A nickle plated open face watch between STEADMAN's elevator and BURROUGH's crossing.  Finder will be suitably rewarded by calling upon the owner, John BRECKENRIDGE.

 

July 24, 1886

DIED

At Leon, on the 14th last, Mrs. Hannah E. SABIN, aged 69 years old and two days.  Mrs. SABIN was born in Medina Co., Ohio on July 12th, 1817.  She was married to J.W. SABIN May 6th, 1832.  They came to Illinois in June 1834.  There were born to them two children, a son and a daughter.  The son married and moved to Kansas, the daughter is the wife of Mr. RICHARDS at whose home Mrs. SABIN died.  In June 1876 Mr. SABIN died, since which time Mrs. SAIBN's health had been poor but her extreme sufferings were reserved for the last few weeks of her life.  She was afflicted with a cancer, inwardly, which was the cause of her death.  Patiently and without a murmur, she suffered much, until death came to her relief.  She was a member of the United Brethren church for over forty years.  Her quiet and gentle spirit, her amiable disposition, her tender regard for others together with her consistent deportment won for her the admiration and esteem of all who knew her.  The funeral took place at Leon church July 15th, services were conducted by Rev. F. STRINGER.  The funeral was very largely attended.

 

July 24, 1886

DUDLEY - In Lyndon, Ill., Tuesday, July 13, 1886, Mrs. TRYPHCULA DUDLEY, Aged 91 years.

 

July 24, 1886

HOLT-At his home in Lyndon Sunday, July 11, 1886, of inflamation of the bowels, Arthur H. HOLT, aged 22 years.

 

July 31, 1886

Lawyer WHITE was at Lyndon, Wednesday trying a lawsuit.

 

July 31, 1886

There were quite a number took the train for the east last Monday morning from here.  Mrs. C.F. GIFFORD and her son Julius, started for Aurora; Abram MYERS for       Mendota; Geo. B. JACKSON for Dover; C.F. GIFFORD for Bradford and Messers. JOHNSON and BURROUGHS for Wyoming.

 

July 31, 1886

J.W. WHITE, of Tampico, is looming up as a candidate for the legislature in great shape.  He has lots of ability, grit and enterprise, and hosts of warm friends all over teh country.  Young blood in teh legislature is not a bad theing to have here - Rock Falls News.

 

July 31, 1886

Robert COLLINS met with a painful accident one day last week.  He was setting tire and in striking with his hammer hit his finger so severe a blow as to almost knock the nail off, in fact the nail was afterwards taken off by the doctor.

 

July 31, 1886

Married

BROWN-McNAUGHTON - At the residence of the bride's parents in this city Thursday, July 29th, 1886 by Reverend F. STRINGER, Herbert E. BROWN and Josephine McNAUGHTON; both of Tampico.  The above was one of the most pleasant and interesting marriages we have witnessed in some time.  About fifty relatives were present.  At 11:30 a.m., the bride and groom made their appearance.  The bride was dressed in blue silk trimmed with blue brocaded velvet and wore a bouquet of white flowers on her left breast, which, to those who knew her, served as an emblem of her purity.  She is the daughter of our esteemed citizen, Mr. J.F. McNAUGHTON.  The groom is the son of Mr. Eleary C. BROWN, on of our respected

farmers who resides south of town.  Herbert is a graduate of Sterling Business College.  Both bride and groom are held in high esteem in this community.  The congratulations were warm and enthusiastic.  After a sumptuous dinner, at which all did justice, a large number of useful and ornamental gifts were presented, a brief and pleasant speech by elder STINGER, and the company returned at their leisure during the afternoon, leaving their best wishes and prayers for the happy couple, in which the Tornado joins most heartily.

 

[ no 8/7 or 8/14 newspapers]

 

August 21, 1886

Hi McKENZIE starts for Lincoln, Nebraska on Monday.  He goes for pleasure trip and to dispose of a heard of cattle he owns there.

 

August 21, 1886

The Oleomargarine law has already had the effect of raising the price of butter, and today butter is more highly colored and stronger than ever!

 

August 21, 1886

Rufus ALDRICH sold his restaurant business to H. CUMMINGS.  Rufus is very successful in buying a business and selling it whenever he chooses.

 

August 21, 1886

Herbert GRISWOLD shipped seven dozen prairie chickens last Monday.  He must have gotten up in the morning to have secured that number before the arrival of the ten o'clock train.

 

August 21, 1886

Conductor HOLMES of the "Q" road tells us that he had a crowded train when he arrived in Mendota last Saturday.  The attraction was BARNUM's show.  Twenty-seven tickets were sold at the station.

 

August 21, 1886

Mrs. L.W. GIFFORD and Miss Gertrude A. SAMPSON, of Boston, Mass. and Miss ELLA F. PATTERSON, of Kansas City, Mo., arrived in Tampico Friday morning, and are guests of ye editor.

 

August 21, 1886

Mr. GORDON, of Seward, Neb., is at present visiting with his uncle, Mr. J.H. CAIN, of this place.

 

August 21, 1886

Mr. John DEVINE, of Hahnaman, rejoiceth over the arrival of a baby boy at his home.

 

August 21, 1886

Mr. Frank REYNOLDS, a builder, architec [sic] and contractor of Chicago, with his family were guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.M. VANDEMARK over Sunday last.  Mr. R. returning home Monday morning and his family took the evening train for Beloit, Wis., where they will visit for a short time before returning to Chicago.  Many of our old residents will remember Mr. REYNOLDS, when we tell them that he is the boy that Mr. VANDEMARK brought up and educated.

 

August 21, 1886

MARRIED

LEHAY-COURTNEY - At St. Mary's Church, in Tampico, Tuesday, August 17th, 1886, by Father McGLENN, Mr. James LEHAY and Mrs. J. COURTNEY, both of Hahnaman.

 

September 4, 1886

Grapes are selling for three and four cents per pound.  Cheap enough, cheaper than many can afford to raise them in Tampico.

 

September 4, 1886

Miss Nellie ALDRICH, who spent her vacation visiting relatives in Woodstock, Ill., returned to her home in Tampico, Saturday, ready to begin school Monday, the opening day.

 

September 4, 1886

Mr. Ed EMMONS told us last Monday that DeWitt WEST and himself were having lots of fun lately fishing.  One night they caught eighty-four pounds of fish, and that night he caught a twenty-four pound catfish which nearly pulled him out of the boat before he was safely landed.

 

September 4, 1886

Marcus THACKABERRY, Esq., of Chicago, arrived in Tampico, Thursday on 5 p.m. train, looking hale and hearty.  He will visit with his parents and friends a short time.

 

September 4, 1886

[more recipes in this issue]

 

 

September 4, 1886

Robert WROTEN invaded the Tornado office last Monday and deposited a water melon on our table.  It was a large ripe one and was raised on his farm.

 

September 11, 1886

During a visit of the veterans of the Grand Army to Los Angeles they joined in an excursion to the beautiful suburb, Passadena [sic].  While there they learned that Jason and Owen BROWN, with their sister, Mrs. THOMPSON, where living near by.  The were at once hunted up, and the children of the old hero of Ossawattomie were put into a carriage, the horses unhitched, and with a long rope attached to Kansas, Iowa, and California boys formed in procession and hauled the family through the streets, the band playing, "John BROWN's Body," and the whole enthusiastic crowd singing the stirring hymn and cheering.  The demonstration visibly affected the occupants of the carriage.  When the procession reached the depot Owen BROWN made a pithy and characteristic speech.

 

September 11, 1886

Prohibition and Women's Rights have been the topic of discussion in Tampico for the past week.

 

September 11, 1886

Mrs. Wm. QUINN, of Woodstock, Ill., has been a guest of Mrs. C.R. ALDRICH, of this place, for the past week.

 

September 11, 1886

Noble FERRIS purchased a fine side-spring buggy last Tuesday.  He is evidently getting ready to attend the fair.

 

September 11, 1886

J. W. GLASSBURN, wife and son Fred, took the train Saturday for Peru, where they spent the Sabbath and from there they visited Chicago, and undoubtedly took in the State Fair and Exposition in that city.

 

September 11, 1886

Death is playing havoc with the Old Settlers of Whiteside Co., Ill.  Since the last annual meeting, the following have passed away:  Mrs. Cynthia JEFFRIES, of Fenton; Henry L. KNOX, of Mt. Pleasant; Lorenzo HAPGOOD, Wm. MANAHAN, and Jonas WINDOM, of Sterling; J.A. TULLER and Elias WARNER, of Prophetstown; Mrs. DUDLEY and J.W. OLDS, of Lyndon; Jacob MURPHY and Mrs. John W. BAKER, of Garden Plain; James C. HUBBARD, of Erie, and Col. E. SEELY, of Portland.  Eulogies on the dead were called for Prof. M.R. KELLEY spoke of Mrs. DUDLEY and Rev. A.M. EARLY spoke of Col. SEELY.  The old settlers of this country are a noble lot of men and women, and we cannot honor them with too much reverence. - Standard.

 

September 11, 1886

A Baptist Social was held in the residence of Mr. and Mrs. E.A. LaDUE, last Tuesday night.  There was a good attendance and the occasion was much enjoyed by all.  Ice cream and cake were served; all for ten cents.

 

September 11, 1886
The Tampico base ball club will play the New Bedford club in New Bedford, Sept. 11, 1886.  The boys had a game here, two weeks ago and the Tampico boys came out ahead, and they expect to-day.

 

September 11, 1886

The Baptist church is being newly painted, the body of the building is to be a Milwaukee brick color and the trimming of a darker color.  When completed it will out shine all others in town.

 

September 11, 1886

During a visit of the veterans of the Grand Army to Los Angles they joined in an excursion to the beautiful suburb, Passedena.  While there they learned that Jason and Owen BROWN, with their sister, Mrs. THOMPSON, were living near by.  They were at once hunted up, and the children of the old hero of Ossawattomie were put into a carriage, the horses hitched, and with a long rope attached the Kansas, Iowan and California boys formed in procession and hauled the family through the streets, the band playing "John Brown's Body," and the whole enthusiastic crowd singing hymn and cheering.  The demonstration visibly affected the occupants of the carriage.  When the procession reached the depot Owen BROWN made a pithy and characteristic speech.

 

September 18, 25, 1886

[no issues microfilmed]

 

 

 

October 2, 1886

Tip DOW is the man to interview if you want to know anything about Chicago.

 

October 2, 1886

Mrs. M.L. BALDWIN, of Rock Falls, was killed by the late accident on the "Q."  Her funeral took place Thursday.

 

October 2, 1886

Geo. H. LUTYENS, out jeweler has just added many new and attractive gems to his stock.  Among the novelties is a large stock of M.W.A., pins, which ought to be worn by every Woodman.  Go get one before the supply is exhausted.

 

October 2, 1886

At the Republican convention, held at Morrison, last Wednesday afternoon, the meeting was called to order by Mr. W.J. McCOY, Chairman of the Republican County Central Committy [sic]; Mr. J. D. PARISH, Secretary. ..... A resolution was then presented and carried which instructed the delegates, to be selected to attend the Senatorial convention of the 19th Senatorial District, to cast their votes for John W. WHITE, of Tampico, for Representative, and to use all honorable means to secure his nomination. .... The following delegates were selected to represent the county at the Senatorial Convention held Oct. 6th.  E.H. NEVITT, Ithamer JOHNSON, F.H. RICHARDSON, Jas. DINSMOOR, Jas. PETTIGREW, Tyler McWHORTER, Chalkly JOHN, F.A. GOULD, Chas. BENT [author of  The History of Whiteside County], D.S. SPAFFORD, J.H. HURLBERT, S.G. BALDWIN, W.C. SNYDER, J.C. YOUNG, A.R. HENDRICKS, W.H. BENNETT, V.S. FERGUSEN, C.L. SHELDON, Horace COLE.

 

October 2, 1886

Abram Myers with his family moved to Mendota this week.  He goes to Washington where he will receive his appointment in the Pension Bureau and be assigned to his post of duty.

 

October 2, 1886

A telegram was received here last Monday, by Mrs. J.C. REEVES, announcing the death of her Father, at Washington City.  She, in company with Mrs. A.S. BREWER, took the 10 o'clock train Monday expecting to reach Washington in time to be present at the funeral.

 

October 2, 1886

Robert COLLINS is doing a thriving business at his blacksmith shop.  In fact his business has increased to such an extent that he has been compelled to put up an addition to his shop to accommodate his increasing trade.

 

October 2, 1886

Miss Grace BROOK took charge of the REEVES' school on Wednesday the 29th.  Miss BROOK is an excellent teacher and without doubt will give the patrons of that district a good school.

 

October 2, 1886

The depot at Denrock has gone west about 100 yards, to where the west "Y" begins.  The change was made for accommodation of the through trains from Rock Island running northwest.

 

October 2, 1886

A large new lamp is now placed at the corner of Main and Market streets, nights when there are meetings at the Lodge Hall.   Upon the glass sides of the lamp appear the names of the societies that hold forth in the hall.  It would be a wise act if our legislative board would place a few large lamps on our street corners for the benefit of our citizens on a dark night.

 

October 9, 1886

James McBRIDE is entertaining his father at present.  Mr. McBRIDE, Sr., hails from Nebraska.

 

October 9, 1886

Gus ANDERSON and family, of Prophetstown, were guests at O.B. KELSSEN's home Monday last.

 

October 9, 1886

Mrs. BARNARD and her daughter, Miss Stella, of Chicago, were guests of Mrs. T.M. WYLIE this week.

 

October 9, 1886

Mrs. Rufus ALDRICH, who has been seriously ill for the past few weeks, is now reported as being somewhat better.

 

October 9, 1886

J.H. ALDRICH, of Guthier Center, Ia., called upon us last Monday.  It seems like old tiems to see John about town once more.  He tells us that the corn crop is good, although potatoes are a very small crop with them.

 

October 9, 1886

William WYLIE, of Bradford, Ill., arrived in town Monday, having made the trip over land with a horse and buggy, in six hours, the distance being some 40 miles.  Will is a good horseman and is capable of getting the speed out of any horse if it is in him.

 

October 9, 1886

W. SEATON and family, of Pecatonica, Ill., were guests at Henry L. DENISON's home from Saturday to Wednesday last.  Mr. SEATON is a very pleasant man to meet and our ride to Sterling with him, in company with Henry DENISON and Geo. B. JACKSON last Monday, was a most pleasant one.

 

October 9, 1886

Chas. NOON, Jr., who resides a few miles southwest of town, called at the Tornado office, Saturday, and deposited $1.50 with us for more Tornadoes.

 

October 9, 1886

John GLASSBURN tells us that A.T. is getting the Dakota fever.  In a letter to his father Tom says he would like to move their west elevator up there and then buy up some of that splendid wheat that grows so abundantly in the Territory.

 

October 9, 1886

N. James COLE, jailer, furnishes the following statement of the movement of the population of the jail in this county, during the month of September, 1886:  In jail Sept. 1st., 17; since committed, 9; total number, 26; released on bail, 2; acquitted, 3; served sentence, 6; executed, 0; otherwise discharged, 2; total deduction, 7; remaining at the end of the month, 19; all males, 18 white and one colored.

 

October 9, 1886

SURPRISED

The celebration of the fifteenth anniversary of the marriage of T.M. WYLIE and wife, which took place Monday evening, Oct. 4th, at their residence, has been the all absorbing topic of social interest of the week, and we might say of the previous week.

The guests were invited into the setting room, where hand in hand stood the bride and groom who with bowed head were listening to the words of their pastor, while, undoubtedly, their thoughts wandered back to the time just fifteen years ago when Thompson M. WYLIE led Miss Minnie BARNARD, a bashful, blushing maiden to the hymnal alter.  Many with thoughtful countenance watched the scene with interest, and many a heart went pit-a-pat as the service continued and the minds of the spectators were carried back to the time when they were the principals instead of witnesses of a like scene.

After the congratulations the bride and groom were presented with a large number of gifts, brought by the guests, who offered them as mementos of their regards and of the high respect and esteem they entertained for Mr. WYLIE and wife.

 

October 9, 1886

Henry PITNEY, son of O.D. PITNEY, has gone to Kansas to make that state his home.

 

October 9, 1886

Gentz PERRY, who lives with his grand pa, Mr. ELMENDORF, brought to the Tornado office, Thursday, two ears of corn.  Upon one ear there were 1,224 kernels,, and upon the other 1,200.

 

 

October 9, 1886

J.E. [Job] GREENMAN and wife [Albina nee DOW], Mrs. O.W. McKENZIE [Emily nee DOW], M. G. LOVE [Martin, husband of Imogene nee McKENZIE], James VanBIBBER, were in Chicago this week.  The gentlemen attended the meeting of the Grand Lodge of Masons of the State of Illinois, Mr. GREENMAN being the delegate representing the Yorktown Lodge of this place.

 

 

October 16, 1886

Alice HUGHES, aged 16, was found drowned in a shallow pond at Moweaqua, Ill., Tuesday.  It is conceded to be a case of suicide, but considerable scandal attaches to the case.

 

 

October 16, 1886

James RENNER, who resides esat of town, deposited $1.50 with us for more Tornadoes.

 

October 16, 1886

Wm. J. LOVE sold his residence and three lots last Monday to Peter FORD, of Hahnaman.  LOVE is to move off the barn and the rest of the property brings hime $700, one half stock the balance cash.  Possession given November 1st, 1886.

 

October 16, 1886

F.H. RICHARDSON and family have broken up housekeeping and Mrs. RICHARDSON and teh children have gone to Avon, Ohio, to spend the winter with her parents.  Fred says he has not yet fully made up his mined whether he will remain here.  His headquarters will be here until further notice.

 

October 16, 1886

For Sale or Trade

My house and lot on Kimball street in Kimball's addition to Tampico, for sale or trade, will take part in stock.  For particulars inquire of Mrs. A. ALDRICH or C.R. ALDRICH, Tampico, Ill.

 

October 16, 1886

Lines on the death of Gracie, daughter of Marcus and Minerva LYON, of Tampico township, who died Oct. 2nd, 1886; aged 11 years, 6 months, 11 days.

Gracie though called away in thy youthful days,

Rembered thou will be for thy winning ways,

And teh patience manifested in those trying hours,

Can we foreget the same also thy love of flowers,

In all the scenes of life, at home or at school,

Ever want thou ready to observe the Golden Rule,

Loved by those with whom you were called to part,

Your youthful virtues will impress the heart,

Of all who realize the words they oft have heard you sing,

"Nearer my God to Thee" who are my Saviour and my King.

B.F.H.

 

October 23, 1886

Mrs. [Anna] John N. HOGEBOOM and daughter called at the Tornado office Wednesday and left $1.50 for renewal of subscription.  Mrs. HOGEBOOM remarked how they could hardly get along without the Tornado.

 

October 23, 1886

Farmers in Fairfield Township are enlarging the West Fairfield County Ditch commencing at the HOGEBOOM and ESTABROOK bridge, running southwest about 4 miles to the MEYERS' Castle farm or BERGE bridge.  Out of ten farmers through whose farms the ditch runs four of them have their work all finished and the others are at work upon their part of the ditch.  It is hoped that the work will be completed before the cold weather sets in.  Boom it along, you will reap the benefits next season.

 

October 23, 1886

Mary LANEwhile playing on a pile of lumber, was badly hurt by the plank falling on her.  Mr. DOW ran to her assistance, and after removing the plank, found her bleeding freely.  Tip thought she was hurt internally.  Dr. SMITH was summoned and on examination it was found that her nose was broken and one leg badly bruised, but otherwise she was not injured; he dressed her wounds and she is getting along as well as can be expected.

 

October 23, 1886

OBITUARY

The subject of this sketch, Benjamin LANE, was born in Marshtown, Webster County, N.Y., in 1804, he resided with his parents until his marriage, when he removed to Michigan.  In 1856 he came to Illinois and took up his abode in Henry county, one-half mile west of Yorktown Corners, which place has ever since been his home.  He married twice, his first wife, Miss Charity ROPER dying many years since,  six children blessed their union, three of whom are living.  His second wife, Mrs. Elizabeth ROBINSON died about four years since [12/6/1882].  His residence in that neighborhood made him widely known and he had may friends.  He was a member of the Free Methodist church and was a devout Christian.  His death occurred on Thursday, Oct. 14th, 1886, and his funeral took place Saturday, Rev. STRINGER officiating; his remains were interred in the Yorktown Cemetery and were followed to their last resting place by a large number of bereaved relatives and friends who with heavy hearts bid adieu to a time honored and respected friend and neighbor.

 

October 23, 1886

J.C. PINKLEY will soon take up his abode in the RICHARDSON house on Market Street.

 

October 23, 1886

Morrison is to be lighted by electric lights.  She's going to put on metropolitan airs.

 

October 23, 1886

Abe FORWARD has taken possession of his father's house and is now a resident of Lincoln Street.

 

October 23, 1886

E. MURRAYhas a good cause to be happy and mirthful for a new son and heir has come to his household.

 

October 23, 1886

Mason aand Eddie REEVES have left twelve bushels of walnuts, at Alf. SMITH's store, which they offer for sale at 75 cents per bushel.

 

October 23, 1886

Tom. STEADMAN has moved into the Gene JACOBS house.  He is now next to the chruch, and as one might say "right under the drippings of the Sanctuary."

 

October 23, 1886

Ed. SHURTLIFF has moved to town and taken up his abode in the ALDRICH house on Market street, just east of JACKSON's.  His family will remain there this winter and Ed. will be at the Ohio Station, where he will have charge of H.E. BROWN's poultry house this season.

 

October 23, 1886

DEER GROVE

Misses Jennie and Annie SMITH, of Sterling, were guests of the WAHL family last week.

 

 

October 30, 1886

H. H [Hiland] HOGEBOOM left a note after stopping at the Tornado and there was no editor; he is getting 40 bushels per acre.

 

October 30, 1886

Mrs. Ella REMINGTON arrived in our city, direct from Dakota last week Friday.

 

October 30, 1886

E.F. BOOTH, of Rhodes, Iowa, passed through our town on his way to Chicago Monday last.  On his way back he and his wife spent a few days visiting friends in this place and Yorktown.

 

November 6, 1886

Peter PIERSON, of Galesburg, was home on a visit to his parents, Mr. O. PIERSON, who resides in this vicinity, and while here he ordered the Tornado sent to his address.

 

November 6, 1886

John CLARK and wife, of Prophetstown, arrived in town Friday of last week and did not return until Monday.  They are guests of their daughter, Mrs. J.S. KIMBALL while here.

 

November 6, 1886

T.O. STEADMAN, who has charge of MOSES & HORN's poultry house of this place, tells us that he is already to start picking.  He has built a high board fence on the south running from the picking to the live house, and a large gate nine feet high on the north side running west.  In delivering poultry the work will be done within this enclosure, so there will be no cause for finding fault with stray feathers being blown about town.  In the picking rooms he has taken up the floors and put down sand and cinders to a depth of six inches.  Under his care we trust our people will have no cause to complain and that his work will prove satisfactory.

 

November 6, 1886

The Tornado received a letter from Clarence M. WINCHELL, of Ouray, Colorado, a former resident of this place, in which he states that "wages are good, the general prices being from $50 to $75 per month with board that beats working on a farm in Illinois for $18 to $20 per month.  The boys in your vicinity ought to come west and get rich."

 

November 6, 1886

Fred ALLEN has taken up residence in the Jim VARIAN house [moving from his farm], and says he is going to try city life for a change.

 

November 6, 1886

Job E. GREENMAN started for Morrison last Wednesday where he will sit upon the bench of justice as a juror, and express his opinion of, and try to unravel the knotty questions that may arise in the cases that he is called upon to adjust.

 

November 6, 1886

The school board has recently purchased an anatomical chart for use in our school.  The action is to be commended.  Good and suitable tools to work with are as essential in school work as in any other line where desirable results are secured.  For years it has been the custom in many localities to furnish the school with fifty or seventy-five dollars worth of apparatus for the study of the comparatively unimportant study of geography, while many other studies, more essential in our estimation, are presented without aid.  This chart is so arranged that the different organs are shown in their true position and natural size; and by an ingenious arrangement dissections are made before the class.  If, as POPE said "The proper study of mankind is man," this chart is certainly the proper thing to have in a school room.

 

November 6, 1886

The famous statue, by Bartholdi, of "Liberty Enlightening the World" was received at New York, June 19th, 1885. The French vessel Isere, with the statue on board, was escorted up the bay to Bedloe's Island by a number of United States men-of-war and other vessels.  The statue stands on Bedloe's Island - hereafter to be known as Liberty Island - at the entrance to New York harbor.  Bartholdi, it is said, conceived the idea of rearing a colossal statue to symbolize America's message of liberty to the world while sailing up New York bay on his visit to this country in 1871, with heart depressed at the ruin and wretchedness in his native land after her defeat by Germanny [sic].  On his return to France he suggested to his friends his idea of such a statue to be presented by the French nation to the United States.  The idea was received with great favor, and so rapidly did subscriptions come in that in 1876 the sculptor began work upon his great statue.  M. Bartholdi supervised every step of the work, which was not only a labor for many years, but one full of difficulty and detail.  The first step toward its construction was made in 1874, when the French-American union was established, a banquet given and an appeal made to the people of France.  In 1876 the sculptor began actual work.  First the artist made his model in clay, and when this was approved a plaster statue was made, in dimensions it was one-sixteenth the size of the intended statue.  Another plaster statue four times as large as the first, and a third, of the full dimensions of the finished work were made.  The last model had to be made in sections, and a wooden frame-work was constructed on which the plaster was spread.  When these sections were completed, wooden models were used, exact copies of the plaster in size and modeling.  These were carefully cut out by hand, and in them were shaped the hammered brass work which forms the outside of the statue.  Eighty-eight tons of brass were used in the structure, and the entire weight of the statue is 400,000 pounds.

 

November 13, 1886

Ed PRATT moved into the Mrs. John ALDRICH house last week.

 

November 13, 1886

The W.C.T.U. will meet next Saturday at 3:30 p.m., at Mrs. Alden BOOTH's residence.

 

November 13, 1886

Charlie BURDEN moved into the rooms above his store formerly occupied by Joe PINKLEY, this week.

 

November 13, 1886

The married people's dance, of Thursday evening, was not as well patronized as was expected.  Only a few numbers were sold; but those that did attend enjoyed themselves.  Everything went off as nice as could be.

 

November 13, 1886

Don't forget the pigeon shoot at Sodtown, Thanksgiving day, at 10 o'clock.

 

November  20 - Dec 18, 1886

[No newspapers microfilmed]

 

December 25, 1886

Died - DIR at the home of her parents, 2 1/2 mile south of Prophetstown, Sunday, December 19th, 1886, of scarlet fever, Berdelle E., the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac W. DIR.

 

December 25, 1886

Harry GIFFORD, who has been confined to bed for the past five weeks by his unruly leg, is now somewhat free from pain, and we look for him to speedily recover.

 

December 25, 1886

Uncle Tom's Cabin troupe which held forth at Union Hall, Wednesday evening, played to a full house.  Some speak very highly of the performance, while others don't think it amounted to "shucks."  Those who speak disparagingly of the show, probably saw the same  piece played, several years ago, at PALMER's Hall, the time when Willard SHELDON's cat made its debut in the full of a full blooded blood hound, and, of course a person pleased with that show could not appreciate the play as presented Wednesday night.  People's tastes differ for a fact.

 

December 25, 1886

Dedication services will be held at Woodman's Hall, Fairfield, Sunday, Jan. 2nd, 1887, at 11 o'clock a.m., Rev. John A. WHIPPLE, of Malden, Ill., will deliver the dedication sermon.  A general invitation is extended to all and especially the Woodmen.

 

December 25, 1886

The W.C.T.U. will meet at Mrs. D. McMILLEN's, Friday, Dec., 31st, 1886, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

December 25, 1886

 

 

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