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Articles & Local History > 1887 - Jan. 1 - Dec. 24 - Tampico Tornado Gossip Column

Transcribed & Submitted by Les Niemi

January 1, 1887

In looking over the files of the Tornado of December 1877, we found an advertisement of ALDRICH & HIXSON's in which they stated that they were selling 9 lbs of Standard sugar for $1 and 10 lbs of Extra C., for $1  To-day [sic] HARRISON is selling double that for $1.  Has prices for other goods fallen in proportion?

 

January 1, 1887

RAT-CATCHING

Jay GOULD paid $400 recently to have his steam yacht Atlanta cleared of rats; then he made a contract with the man to keep the Atlanta free from rats in consideration of $300 per year.  There is in this city men who make their yearly contracts to have their factories or store kept free from rats, and pay from $50 tp $100 a year.  The professional rat-catcher of this city is little old John GREGORY, whose quaint little figure, with his tow terriers and his box of ferrets on his back, and his pipe in his mouth, is familiar to all parts of the city.  He is known as "English Jack."  He has been a professional rat-catcher in this city for more than thirty years, and he started the business through the late Matthew BALDWIN, the founder of BALDWIN Locomotive Works.  "English Jack" was born in Nottingham, England and forty years ago, when he was about 25 years old,  he came to this city with a man named WALLET, who was known at home as the "Queen's Jester."  WALLET was a sporting man and had a good deal of money.  He settled in Frankford and had a good stable of horses.  Rats became plentiful and "English Jack" bought three ferrets and rid the stable of all the rats.

Shortly afterward WALLET went back to England and left "English Jack" with nothing but his three ferrets.  It was a time that Matthew BALDWIN heard of Jack, and his ferrets and Jack was employed to rid Mr. BALDWIN's stable of rats.  Mr. BALDWIN recommended Jack to other prominent men whose stables were over run with rats, and Jack was kept busy and was well paid for his work.  Since then he has done nothing else but catch rats, and he has made not only a comfortable living, but has laid by something for a rainy day.

Jack is the most expert rat handler in this country.  Although he is as nimble as a cat, and has taken part in many a rat-handling match in this city.  Four years ago at John DICKENSON's on Beach street, he picked one hundred live rats with his bare hands in one minute and three seconds.  His best record was made about six years ago, when he handed one hundred rats in forty-two seconds.  The last match in which he picked up one hundred rats he was bitten a dozen times, and nearly lost one of his fingers.  Jack come of real old English sporting stock, and when rat-killing and handling matches were a favorite sport he supplied the rat pits with the live rodents.  Many of the rat mains that have taken place in New York and Philadelphia in the past were patronized by the club men, who always paid Jack for his trouble.  In his little barn, back of his quaint little house, at forty-seventh street and Darby road, he sat yesterday, with his peip in his mouth and a ferret crawling over his shoulder.  He stroked the fur on the ferret's back and said in his broad english:

"Aye, lad, I've caught many a thousand rats.  I've cleaned them out of many a gentleman's stable,  out of stores and ships.  I've had my ferrets at work in Lorillard's and Bonner's and Dwyer's stables.  I've had them in the hold of many an ocean steamship.  Mr. Cassatt is one of my best patrons, and in fact me and my ferrets are patronized by the best gentlemen of this land."

 

 

January 8, 1887

SCHOOL REPORT

Report of the WEST school for the month ending December 21st, 1886.

Number of days taught, 21; boys enrolled, 21; girls enrolled, 10; perfect in deportment, 26; in punctuality, 15;  average daily attendance, 23.4; minutes tardy, 172; visits, 7; neither absent nor tardy, Zora BLACK, Chas. ROGERS, Lewis WINCHELL, May BOGART, Erving MOSIER, Chas. KELLEY.  Sickness caused several to be absent.

J.H. FEE, Teacher

 

January 8, 1887

The invitation generously given by the Woodmen of Fairfield to begin this New Year of our Lord 1887 in praise and prayer in their commodious hall was responded to by many.  The day was cold; but one scarce heeded it as they listened to the soft strains of the organ as it led the many voices in the grand old hymn "Rock of Ages," and who shall know how many a weary one forgot their cares and trials as the words of divine truth fell from the speaker's lips, Rev. WHIPPLE, of Malden; his text was well chosen, Cor. 1 chapter and 18th, verse, and no greater compliment can be given the speaker than this truthful one, earnestly and eloquently were the truths spoken that one lost all thought of the speaker in the theme, and felt that at the foot of the cross and in its shadow is wisdom and joy.  The sacred song sung by Mrs. BOOTH with its earnest inquiry still haunt the listeners and must be heard to be appreciated.  I am sure that I speak for all when I say that the wives and daughters of the Woodmen unite in thanks true and sincere.

It matters not where the spot, it may be hallowed by prayer.

Be it heaven's vast dome, or the kings grand throne, if only God is there.

At the Center Sunday School the Sabbath after Christmas, one of the teachers Miss M. CURLEY presented her class with handsome Christmas cards.  She also presented on of her scholars with a beautiful book entitled "Harry's Vacations or Philosophy at Home" by W. C. RICHARDS, for his regular attendance spring the past year.

Mrs. J.N. [Anna] HOGEBOOM

 

January 15, 1887

San Francisco was visited by an earthquake last Tuesday, the shock lasting several seconds.

 

January 15, 1887

The poultry house is booming again.

 

January 15, 1887

Charley ALDRICH was reported on the sick list Tuesday.

 

January 15, 1887

Alden BOOTH had a slight shock of paralysis last Monday.

 

January 15, 1887

Mrs. J.W. WHITE is visiting with her parents at Rock Falls.

 

January 15, 1887

Revival meetings were started at the M.E.Church Thursday night.

 

January 15, 1887

O.B. KELSEN is able to be at his shop and oversee to his business again.

 

January 15, 1887

Oysters, Oysters, by the can or dish – stews or raws, at LaDUE Grocery.

 

January 15, 1887

Is your house insured?  If not you had better attend to it, as these are bad times for a fire.

 

January 15, 1887

Prophetstown is sadly in need of a revival, so says a correspondent to the xxx xxxx.

 

January 15, 1887

B.M. DeGROFF will be pleased to serve his many friends at the FARWELL Block Store, Sterling, Ill.

 

January 15, 1887

The old settlers of Bureau county propose to erect a log cabin on the fair grounds in Princeton this year.

 

January 15, 1887

Non-smokers digest there food in six hours, while smokers require twelve hours. – N.Y. Medical Abstract.

 

January 15, 1887

It must be exhilarating sport to slide down a toboggan chute when the velocity require is at the rate of ninety-three miles per hour.

 

January 15, 1887

Progressive euchre is the game just now and denisons of some of the neighboring towns are fairly “carried away” with the game.

 

January 15, 1887

Price of Millinery marked town one fifth.  A large Stock of Knit Goods and Silk Mufflers Cheap, at Miss HIGDAY’s

 

January 15, 1887

The Sentinel says L.F. SULLIVAN received a sever scalp wound by a falling tree, while cutting wood in the timber near Morrison.

 

January 15, 1887

If you want to rent or buy a house or houses in the village of Tampico, if you want to buy a farm or farms, call on J.F. LEONARD.

 

January 15, 1887

It is estimated that there is 400,000 tons of California wheat in sight, a surplus of 8,000,000 bus [sic] more than is needed for home consumption.

 

January 15, 1887

The court house building at Oregon, Ogle county, don’t seem to suit Judge EUSTACE, who calls it an old shell and other wise condemns it.

 

January 15, 1887

If you are in need of a sewing machine, do not buy until you have found out what you can do with us.  We sell at prices clear below them all.

 

January 15, 1887

Desire MOOR and Plenty MOOR are the names of two sisters now in Washington.  Any one can Desire Moore but to get Plenty Moore is not so easily done.

 

January 15, 1887

Some one who has tried the experiment says that show windows can be kept clear of frost and ice accumulation by rubbing with a cloth dipped in glycerine.

 

January 15, 1887

Hon. J.W. WHITE was home to spend Sunday last.  He left for Springfield on the evening train Monday to be there in time to cast a vote for Unites States Senator.

 

January 15, 1887

Ed. MaCOMBER last a valuable mare last Monday.  The animal had been ill for several days but the nature of her illness could not be ascertained so as to give her relief.

 

January 15, 1887

John G. ROGERS, Chief Justice of the Circuit Court was stricken down with heart disease and dies in a dry goods store in Chicago while attending to the settlement of a bill.

 

January 15, 1887

A subscription paper was circulated about town last Tuesday receiving donations for the purpose of purchasing a horse for Rev. STRINGER to take the plase of the one he lost last week.

 

January 15, 1887

Squire LEONARD says, “The backbone of the hard timers is broken and we are entering upon a more prosperous area.”  We hope so and trust our progress will be rapid and sure.

 

January 15, 1887

After the skate last Saturday night, those in attendance indulged in a little dance.  CAIN & JACKSON are trying to make their Saturday night’s skate very pleasant and agreeable.

 

January 15, 1887

LaMoille has a toboggan slide.  Wm. MARRIOT, Jr., and W.E. HEATHCOTE are the proprietors and managers.  Why don’t some enterprising chap build a toboggan slide here.  It’s paying card.

 

January 15, 1887

A bill has been presented in the House, by Mr. FULLER, which proposes to limit the interest rate to 6 per cent.  Everybody but money loaners will be pleased to have the bill successfully put through the mill.

 

January 15, 1887

Prof. M.E. KELLY’s lecture, “Hinderences [sic] to Education,” is being well received.  The Prof. is a fluent, earnest talker, and having been for many years a teacher is posted upon the subject he has chose for his discourse.

 

January 15, 1887

PARKER, of Rock Falls News, has lately become a grandpa. The news was telegraphed him from the far west; but the message did not state whether it was a girl or a boy.  PARKER telegraphed back to ascertain the sex of the child, and has by this time found out and is prepared to “set ‘em up.”  Better call and congratulate him.

 

January 15, 1887

This week we finished a little contract of printing of three thousand note and letter heads and six thousand bank checks, one-half of which were bound 35 to 50 in a book, for J.W. GLASSBURN & Sons.  These gentlemen know that the Tornado office does good work, at reasonable prices, and what is better they believe in patronizing home firs, outsiders afterwards.

 

January 15, 1887

The weather moderated; but a strong east wind is blowing and is very cold.

 

January 15, 1887

Over 800,000 steerage passengers were landed at Castle Garden during the year of 1886.

 

January 15, 1887

H.E. BROWN became a Woodmen last Wednesday evening.  Tampico Camp No. 9, now numbers 66.

 

January 15, 1887

Hannibal HAMLIN had a brother named Julius Cesar CINCINATUS, and his four sisters bore the names of Europe, Asia, Australia, and America.

 

January 15, 1887

It is proposed to pension the families of the men who lost there lives defending the Maine game law.  The heart of the Pine Tree State beasts warmly for the native moose.

 

January 15, 1887

A bill to prohibit the pool-sellign on sporting or other matters, and providing a penalty of $2,000 or imprisonment for one year, was introduced Tuesday in the Illinois House.

 

January 15, 1887

J.M. BICKFORD, of the firm BRICKFORD & FLEXER, of Rock Falls, manufacturers of the Aldery Butter Color, made the Tornado office a call Tuesday, while in Tampico placing his butter color on sale.

 

January 15, 1887

WILLETT says this is a prosperous section to live in and known it for he has gained twenty-five pounds in weight since he came here.  Talk about hard times and short crops when a man can accumulate bodily wealth in such proportions.

 

January 15, 1887

Harry GIFFORD sniffed the fresh outdoor air last Sunday, for the fist time in two months.  Charley ALDRICH drove around to the house and Harry was lifted into the cutter and taken to Mr. ALDRICH’s home where he was most pleasantly entertained during the afternoon.

 

 

January 15, 1887

At the time the Republicans stepped down and out there were 285 Republicans employed in the Custom House in New Orleans, 275 of that number have been removed and Democrats have taken their places.  Civil service reform is not much  of a cord in the South.

 

January 15, 1887

Frank THOMAS has our thanks for Los Angeles papers.  The Evening Express of Dec. 31st, has sever columns devoted to a review summery of the business and improvements of that city and adjacent country and a flattering prediction for the future out-look of the Southern California.

 

January 15, 1887

At about 9 nine o’clock Tuesday morning John HARRINGTON, the fireman at H.D. BURT & Son’s flouring mill in this city started to open a keg of Monarch Boiler Compound, used for cleaning the scales from boilers.  He bent over the keg and struck the head a few light blows when the contents exploded, filling his eyes with the burning fluid.  Dr. LEACH, occultist, examined HARRINGTON’s eyes and said they were badly burned.  The keg contained 140 pounds of the compound. – Fulton Journal.

 

January 15, 1887

Rev. F.C. MARSHALL, of Moran Park, will preach in the Baptist Church next Sunday morning.

 

January 15, 1887

The light rain of Thursday evening terminated in a snow storm and by the next morning about two inches of snow had fallen.

 

January 15, 1887

MARRIED

LaRUE-GRISWOLD – At the M.E. Parsonage, in Prophetstown, Dec., 30th, 1886, by Rev. J.L. BAKCUS, Mr. John H. LaRUE and Miss Nellie M. GRISWOLD, both of Tamico

HALSTEAD-ULM – At the residence of Mr. John MILLER, Sterling, Ill., Tuesday, Jan. 11th, 1887, by Rev. E. BROWN, Mr. S. Warren HALSTEAD, of Hahnaman, and Miss Lillie ULM, of Sterling, Ill.

 

January 15, 1887

Clearing Sale.  Everything in the line of Millinery, Notions, and Knit Goods, and Special Bargins in Ladies’ Pants and Vests that have been selling for 50c., a piece are now selling for 38c.  Children’s for 25c a piece.  Mrs. D. P. ALDRICH.

 

January 15, 1887

MEMORY TEAR.

 

Of the birds that wing the air on Tennessee’s grand shore,

The Alabama nightingale they told me o’er and o’er;

When BUELL’s men on Shiloh’s field lie morning all around

Sang for the boys in blue and the calm old moon went nown.

 

Of all the weapons through weal or woe love long has had its sway;

But ambitions men make war and laws then draft our sons away

As if we had no more to do in the wide world urbane;

But stay at home raise sons for bold renown and fame.

 

With all the daughters of our land on Columbia’s wide domain,

None seem so true in goodness, as those that suffered pain,

With ruined hopes and long good-byes for fallen here lads

That faced the boom of cannon of the fires iron clads.

 

Of all the sunny vineland hills or domes of deep toned bells,

None like those of Huntsville will cause any hear to swell.

Go weave a garland for the youth, with roses write his fame,

And brush the moss from the stone that hides that beautiful name.

 

-Rosanna KEMP.

 

January 22, 1887

Tip DOW is having a bad time with his wounded arm.

 

January 22, 1887

F.E. McKENZIE, of Colorado, Mitchell county, Texas, a cousin of Mrs. [Imogene McKENZIE] M.G. [Martin] LOVE, has been in this vicinity visiting the past week.

 

January 22, 1887

Robt. McKENZIE, happy, genial, and merry, was in town Thursday.  It is safe to state that he is better known, has more friends and solid comfort to the square inch than any man in the northwest part of Bureau or the southeast part of Whiteside counties.

 

January 22, 1887

A few friends of Mr. and Mrs. [Martin & Imogene nee McKENZIE] M. G. LOVE, called upon them in their residence in this place, last Thursday and aided in celebrating the fifteenth anniversary of their marriage.  There were a number in from the country, and a pleasant time was enjoyed, the bride and groom were the recipients of a number of presents that were given as mementos of the occasion.

 

January 29, 1887

B.F. [Byron] HOGEBOOM living 1 1/2 miles east of Yorktown, lost a valuable mare by being hooked by a bull, belonging to him.

 

February 5, 1887

Geo. JOHNSON and wife were guests at father McNAUGHTON's over Sunday last.

 

February 5, 1887

Tip DOW tried the effects of a little hair dye on his whiskers the other day.  If you scrutinize him real closely you will notice the change in their wonted looks.

 

February 5, 1887

Maine and Ohio people are worried about hard cider.  The Maine Legislature has a bill preventing the sale of apple juice over twenty days old, and the DOW law in Ohio makes hard cider an intoxicant.

 

February 5, 1887

C.F. GIFFORD  H.L. GIFFORD

Gifford & Son, Pubs.,

TAMPICO TORNADO

We have formed a co-partnership with our son, Harry L. GIFFORD, and the business connected with the Tornado office will hereafter be carried on under the firm name of GIFFORD & Son.  We take pleasure in introducing our partner to the readers of the Tornado, and trust they will appreciate his efforts to please.  "Two heads are better than one," sayeth the old adage, and in this instance we will try and make the rule hold good.

Chas. F. GIFFORD

 

February 12, 1887

The best Hard Coal $7.00 per ton at Moses DILLON's in Sterling.

 

February 12, 1887

H. E. BROWN has closed out his poultry house at Fulton, returning from there Thursday.

 

February 12, 1887

A bill has been introduced in the Tennessee Legislature tendering to the United States the Hermitage farm famous as the home of Andrew JACKSON, as an asylum for disabled and invalid soldiers.

 

February 12, 1887

An earthquake shock was felt in the Central part of this state last Sunday.  At Springfield there were five distinct shocks that rattled crockery from shelves and alarmed the people very much.  In the suburbs of St. Louis, Mo., the houses were rocked as if they would fall, but no harm done.

 

February 12, 1887

Thomas A. EDISON, of New York, has the honor of receiving more patents than any other American, past or present.  His applications number 701, and the list is still growing.

 

February 19, 1887

The Governor of Iowa issued a proclamation Tuesday forbidding the importation of cattle from Illinois.

 

February 19, 1887

Sleighing is about gone.

 

February 19, 1887

Did you get a valentine?

 

February 19, 1887

Four-leaf clover clubs are fashionable.

 

February 19, 1887

The editor and his son Arthur went to Chicago last Monday morning.

 

February 19, 1887

Two car loads of hogs were shipped from here last Tuesday evening.

 

February 19, 1887

Oysters, Oysters, by the can or dish – stewed or raws, at LaDUE’s Grocery.

 

February 19, 1887

A co-operative store is to be started at Lyons, Iowa, by the Knights of Labor.

 

February 19, 1887

Sewing Machines and all kinds of attachments for sale at the Tornado office.

 

February 19, 1887

The Czar of Russia is said to have ordered a picture of the St. Paul ice palace.

 

February 19, 1887

A good many farmers came to town Monday, although the weather was stormy.

 

February 19, 1887

Tom STEADMAN went to Morrison, Tuesday, were he will serve as petit juror.

 

February 19, 1887

Chance. McKENZIE shipped two carloads of fattened steers to Chicago Monday night.

 

February 19, 1887

Job GREENMAN was clerk in John PAICE’s store, while John was setting at Sterling seeing the river.

 

February 19, 1887

For the first time in the history of New Orleans the gambling-houses are closed-to await result of prosecutions.

 

February 19, 1887

If you want to buy a new sewing machine come and see us before making a purchase.  We sell at a very low figure.

 

February 19, 1887

The city of Elgin has voted one hundred thousand dollars for water works and is advertising for proposals for their construction.

 

February 19, 1887

The river at Sterling is gradually receeding [sic] and it is hoped that it will soon be within its banks and no further damage will be done.

 

February 19, 1887

The fist license ever granted to a woman to run a steam-engine was obtained not long since by Miss Mary S. BENNAN of Cincinnati.

 

February 19, 1887

Ex-Postmaster, C.M. WORTHINGTON, of Sterling has gone into the tobacco and cigar business at that place.  Charley is a good judge of the weed.

 

February 19, 1887

A good many persons went from here to Sterling to see Rock river last Monday.  And report that the river is a sight worth going out to see.

 

February 19, 1887

Closing Out.  Bargains in Millanary, Hoods and Ladies’ Underwear.  The above Goods at Cost,. at Miss HIGDAY’s.

 

February 19, 1887

Ed. HIXON [sic] expects to return to Dakota in a short time.  He says he can stand it there during the summer months, but Tampico is better place to winter.

 

February 19, 1887

When a Grand Rapids society belle marries, the papers of that city publish her portrait and that of her dog.  The groom cuts no figure in the report.

 

February 19, 1887

AUSTIN and Co., of this city  and Round Grove have purchased the live stock business of TUMBLESON Bro’s at Galt and Rock Island Junction.  – Sentinel.

 

February 19, 1887

A Very Fine Dress Corkscrew Worst Suite, no cotton, strictly wool worsted, elegantly made and trimmed, at only $10; others ask $18.  D. GOLDSMITH.

 

February 19, 1887

Some people think this is about the lowest place on the globe; but we here it is fifteen feet higher than Sterling.  How is that for high?

 

February 19, 1887

Mr. ALLEN, who has been working for T.M. WYLIE for the past year, left for a week for a weeks visit with friends south of here, previous to his embarking for his western home.

 

February 19, 1887

Mrs. Henry WOOD, the author of “East Lynne,” died in London when within a few months of completing here three score and ten years.  She was probably the most prolific authoress of the century.

 

February 19, 1887

F.H. RICHARDSON is making a visit at Avon, Ohio, where his wife and children have been spending the winter with her parents.  Fred expects to be back in time to have a hand in shaping things for the spring elections.

 

February 19, 1887

$12 Mens’ Fine Suites at $7 at D. GOLDSMITH’s, Sterling.

 

February 19, 1887

C.F. GIFFORD has formed a partnership with his son Harry, and the Tampico Tornado will be published hereafter, by the firm of C.F. GIFFORD & Son.  We wish them success – Spike.

 

February 19, 1887

City man: “What the blazes is the matter with that hen?”  Farmer: “Noting.  She has just laid an egg.”  City man: “Great Scott!  One would suspose [sic] she had just laid the foundation for a brick block.” – Ex.

 

February 19, 1887

Edward SAPP, of Harrington, Kent Co., Del., was in town visiting old friends and acquaintances.  Before he left he called on the Tornado office and left cash for more Tornadoes.  Ed. is looking well and hearty.

 

February 19, 1887

A lawyer in Chicago presently secured a client in a man charged with counterfeiting, and received as a retainer four $50 bills, when he went to deposit them in a bank he was told they were bogus, and with remarkable presence of mind withdrew from the case.

 

February 19, 1887

Jacob EISELE, the Sterling Taylor, has received his spring stock of Cloths for suites, pants and overcoats.  He has the largest and best stock shown in Sterling.  He invites you to come and see his fine assortment.

 

February 19, 1887

STILSON’s has just the nicest Ladies Kid Shoe made for $2.00.

 

February 19, 1887

The rain Thursday put a stop to the work upon the new creamery.

 

February 19, 1887

The finest line of Mens’ $5 Suits ever shown in Sterling.  D. GOLDSMITH

 

February 19, 1887

If you want to make the old soldiers mad just ask them “How’s CLEVELAND?”

 

February 19, 1887

If this weather continues wild ducks and geese will soon begin to put in an appearance.

 

February 19, 1887

Another rain last Thursday.  It is not much of a trick to ‘get up a shower at most any time of late.

 

February 19, 1887

C.F. GIFFORD & Son now publish the Tampico Tornado, the latter having taken in as a partner. – News.

 

February 19, 1887

LATHROP has postponed his sale.  Our readers will be informed when it will take place at the proper time.

 

February 19, 1887

Every lady caught to have on of those Bamboo baskets, at STILSON’s, which contains one pound of the best Jap tea.

 

February 19, 1887

W.R. COBB has again taken up the pencil in the sanctum of the Sterling Gazette.  The Tornado wishes him success.

 

February 19, 1887

Maurice HOVEY, who arrived here last week Friday, started on his homeward journey last Thursday, after a very pleasant visit with friends and old school mates here.

 

February 19, 1887

The following constitute our Roll of Honor, for the week, of paid, renewals and new subscribers:  T.A. SANDERS, Wm. McLEAN, M.J. FERRIS, Geo. W. APLEY, Milton SWOPE, John MARTIN.

 

February 19, 1887

We are indebted to Frank MELVIN of Del Norte, Col., for a copy of the “San Louis Valley Graphic,” which is a paying and newsy sheet, published in a town fifteen miles from Del Norte.

 

February 19, 1887

Rock Falls has at last awakened to the fact that she has not sufficient protection against fire, and is talking of putting in 1 ½ miles of piping with 15 hydrants, at a cost of $750 per year.

 

February 19, 1887

Alf. SMITH found a curiosity in the shape of a hen’s egg last Tuesday.  The egg was lain by a large hen and its minute size is one of the peculiar frees of nature.  The measurement is 2 ¾ x 2 7/8 inches in circumference.

 

February 19, 1887

If you want to rent or buy a house or houses in the village of Tampico, if you want to buy a farm or farms, call on J.F. LEONARD.

 

February 19, 1887

A man may feel honored at the receipt of a decent valentine; but when he opens an envelope, and finds one of the horrid dobs, he just feels like – well, as if he would like to kick some one [sic].

 

February 19, 1887

Sterling has a “Business Men’s Association.”  If it is the business of the associate to invite manufactures to locate there and to work for the best interest of the town.  Why would it not be well for Tampico to have a like association?

 

February 19, 1887

A man must now live as long in the State of Delaware to qualify himself for the privilege of catching a shad as he has to stay in Rhode Island in order to get a divorce from his wife, or in Pennsylvania to assist in choosing a governor.  It s a great privilege to catch shad in Delaware waters; but it is hard on the casual fisherman that he must tarry a year before he can enjoy the pleasure of fishing.  – Ex.

 

February 19, 1887

There is no tea that will excel the 75 cts tea, put up in a nice Bamboo basket, direct from Japan.  Call at STILSON’s and examine it.

 

February 19, 1887

C.E. WILLIAMS, of New Boston, is now enstalled [sic] as clerk in T.M. WYLIE’s hardware store.  He is an experienced tinner and a competent business man.  He expects to soon move his family here.  We welcome Mr. WILLIAMS to our midst and hope his stay will be apleasant and profitable one.

 

February 19, 1887

We are indebted to Turner LEE for a description of the thrilling scene that occurred on Rock river last week Friday night, at the rescue of those two young men who were boat wrecked and remained on the ice and trees for fifteen hours.  Mr. LEE fell into the water three times while trying to get to them, and though wet and cold he bravely battled on and after four attempts was one who successfully brought them to shore.

 

February 19, 1887

E.W. BLOSSOM’s Jewelry Store, at Sterling, is one of the finest establishments in the Northwest.  He has a fine display of Watches, Clocks, Silverware and Jewelry of all kinds.  If you wish to buy a Watch, Clock, or have one repaired, E.W. BLOSSOM’s Sterling, is the place to go, he is a gentleman and will with a smiling countenance and kind words give you especial attention.  Give him a call when in Sterling.

 

February 19, 1887

Prof. BALLON started his class in the arts of crystal painting Tuesday.  He says his class is making splendid headway and evince talent and skill far superior to any class he as had in a long time.  In speaking of our town and its people he expresses himself well pleased with them and remarked to us that he has never found a place where they were so friendly and congenial as here.  He thinks we can well be proud of our little village, its society and business circles.  In leaving here he goes to Walnut and Mendota, and on his way back will make Tampico another visit.

 

February 19, 1887

Do you want Sewing Machine Needles, Belts, Oil or any other article in the way of Machine Attachments?  If so call at the Tornado office for them.

 

February 19, 1887

If you want 5 pounds of the best ground coffee, for $1.00, go to STILSON’s and you can find it.

 

February 19, 1887

Frank BUTTON, of Sterling, has been appointed mail agent.  He makes the third boy who has received a similar appointment.  Representative JOHNSON must be getting in hs work pretty good for the boys of his own town.

 

February 19, 1887

Mrs. Deacon WHITMAN, of Sterling, received a bad fall Tuesday of this week.  She had no broken bones but the shock to her nervous system was quite severe.

 

February 19, 1887

J.K. CHESTER has received his new spring goods.  His assortment of Skirting is large and complete.  He has a few cloaks left which he will give away at your own prices, he must close them out.  Do not fail to see him.  He buys for cash and sells for cash and that is a secret of his low prices.

 

February 19, 1887

DIED

CONROY – At his residence, one mile south of Tampico, on Friday, February 11th, 1887, of paralysis of the heart, James CONROY; aged 74 years.

The deceased was a native of Ireland, and came to New York in his youth, from whence he removed to Illinois in 1846, locating and erecting a house and making his home where he died.  He broke the sod and tilled the soil and collected around him a competency as a reward of an industrious, frugle [sic] and upright life.

His family, of eight children and his estimable wife, were his stay and comfort of his declining years.  He was a kind and indulgent father, and in return was honored, respected and loved by his family, with the love that was strong and unfaltering.  As a man he was esteemed and respected by all who know him and all had a kind and pleasant word for “Uncle Jimmy,” wherever he went.  In his dealings he was upright, conscientious and honest, his word was a good as his acts.  He was a member of the Roman Catholic church and a devout Christian, keeping his mind steady on the faith to which he adhered, with the full assurance that he was loved by his friends, and would obtain his reward in the great hereafter.

“Oh, how awed in this assurance,

‘Midst the conflict and the strife;

Although sorrows past endurance

Follow us through life.”

During late years he had been rather feeble, yet his indomitable will kept him up, and he often tried to do more than his body could endure.  He had one attack lately and his family were seriously fearful that something of a worse nature would befall him, and consequently kept a careful watch over him.  On the day of his death Mr. CONROY was apparently in his usual health.  He went out to the barn to feed his chickens, as he was accustomed to do.  After being out about fifteen minutes, Mrs. CONROY sent her daughter, Agnes, to see where her father was.  When the child went out she discovered her father laying upon the ground near the corn crib.  She ran to him and found that he was lifeless.  She, with the assistance of Mr. Olaf PETERSON, carried him to the house, deceased being yet warm.  Dr. A.C. SMITH was summoned, but his patient had passed beyond all human aid.

The funeral took place in St. Mary’s church, Sunday morning, Father FITZSIMMONS, of Peoria, officiating.  There was a large concourse of relatives and friends in attendance, who followed the remains to the last resting place with bowed heads and heavy hearts.  The family have the sympathy of the entire community in this their sad hour of bereavement.

 

February 19, 1887

Notice to Woodmen.

Our regular meeting occurs next Wednesday evening, Feb. 23.  A full attendance is desired, as important business is to come before the meeting.

F.S. JOHNSON, Consul.

 

February 19, 1887

Notice.

All persons indebted to J.S. WILLETT be sure to call and settle on or before January 10th, 1887, and save collection fees.

 

February 19, 1887

T.S. BALDWIN leaped from a balloon one thousand feet up in the air at San Francisco the other day, and reached the ground without injury, by means of a parachute he held with his hands.

 

February 26, 1887

Capt. PIGG, of the Salvation Army, and Chas. KIMER, of Sterling, were sentenced to jail for twenty days and fined $10 each for stealing coal at that city.

 

February 26, 1887

G.K. [George, Fred's adoptive father] ALLEN shipped his household goods from this place to Nebraska this week, where he will engage in farming the coming season.

 

February 26, 1887

NOTICE

To whom it may concern. - I have this day given my son Floyd DOW, (a minor) his time, and he is authorized to transact business for himself as if of lawful age, I will not collect any of his wages or pay any debts of his contracting after this date.  H.H. DOW. [Floyd was born 2/13/1873, thus he had just turned 14 years old when his father "Tip" DOW gave this notice.]

Tampico, Ill., Feb., 27th, 1887.

 

March 5, 1887

There have been a number of arrivals here of late.  Among the latest are, a girl at Fred ALLEN's, a girl at E. McCLURE's, a boy at J. MORSE's, and a girl at Geo. WINTER's.  The fathers are all in high spirits and speak in flattering tones of the future prospects of their daughters and son.

 

March 5, 1887

The New Creamery

The new creamery building is making a remarkable good showing for the time the carpenters have been at work upon it.  It looms up near Cemetery hill in fine shape.  Located, as it is, in the northern  part of the town, on the east side of Main Street, one of the most sightly peaks in the town, it is plainly seen from almost any direction, and is destined to be a business mart that we can well be proud of.  The main building is 38x40 feet in size and is divided into four rooms, the cream room, the churning room, the refrigerator and the wash rooms.  Attached to the building on the east is the engine room where the motive power which run the machinery will come from.  On the north is a large ice house and on the south side is the elevator and platform for the reception of the cream from the delivery wagons.  The machinery to be used is of the Cedar Rapids patent and considered to be the best in use.  When the building is completed and the machinery in running order Tampico will have a creamery that stands second to none in these parts, and one they need not be ashamed to show to visitors.

This is the fourth creamery that Mr. COOPER is connected with, the other three are located in Jefferson City, and Holden, Mo., and Davis City, Iowa.  In the former issue we stated that he was connected with an Elgin Creamery, but we were misinformed and gladly make the correction.

 

March 12, 1887

Butter is not much cheaper now than it has been.  It is now quoted at 20 cents per pound.

 

March 19, 1887

Gail HAMILTON says:  "Women can never hope to rule the State until they give up their baby names."  Think of a woman running for Governor and President bearing the infantile name of Minnie, Pettie, Kittie, or Susie!  As Governors have old fashioned names like Dick, Tom and Abe.

 

March 19, 1887

A good many people are asking:  "Why don't Tampico have Street lamps?"  That is a question we have asked ourselves a good many times.  For a small sum several lamps might be put in, and the people would be benefitied [sic] so much, that their cost, would fall in the shade.  Other towns of this size, and smaller have, and maintain street lamps, and we don't see why Tampico should take a back seat.

 

March 19, 1887

WOMEN'S WAGES

Some Weak Spots in Our Boasted American Civilization

There is something wrong about that civilization which compels a woman to work sixteen hours per day for six days in a week in order to earn $3.50.  Unfortunately there are women in the large cities who have to work in this way.  It is hard for people who have the means of supplying their daily wants to realize that any of their fellow-beings are doomed to a life of darkness and grinding poverty such as those women endure.

 

March 19, 1887

Mrs. John [Anna] HOGEBOOM has our thanks for a jar of maple syrup.  The syrup is made from the sap of soft maple trees and was manufactured at her home.  There are about 34 trees that have been tapped and thus far she has made 12 gallons of syrup.  On Wednesday 19 pails full of sap were gathered.  The syrup is of fine flavor and about the best we've ever eaten.

 

March 26, 1887

Grandmother WROTEN died at Charlie LANE's residence last Monday evening, of Dropsay, aged about seventy years.  Her funeral was held at the M.E. Church of this place Wednesday and was interred in the Fairfield cemetery.

 

April 2, 1887

OBITUARY

Mrs. Margaret Adell WROTEN was born in Virginia, and when but a child removed with her parents to the State of Ohio, where at the age of 19 years she married Thomas WROTEN.  Six years later herself and husband came, with only three little ones, to Illinois, and made a home in Bureau county when the county was new, and patiently wore the trials and hardships that many of the pioneers of early years had to face as well.

Eleven children taken to cheer her home, some, like the prairie flowers, soon faded, and the sunshine and shadows chased each other over her earthly pathway.  At last the dark days of 1861 came, and like many another noble mother she, with tearful eyes bade God speed to her three noble sons, as the left their home to fight for their country.  But when she went forth to meet them one was missing.  He slept on Carinth's bloody battle field, where he fell fighting for the dear flag.

For years she has been a great sufferer; but was always cheerful and busy, trying faithfully to do the work of the Master, always caring for the sick and afflicted.  For eight years she has been a member of the Church of God. For six years she as been a widow.  Her children truly "Arose and called her blessed," and truly the world is a better place for her having lived.  The last few weeks of her life were spend away from home, for she died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Charles LANE.  Though her old friends and neighbors were not permitted to watch over her in her last hours, there were no lack of kind faces and gentle hands to smooth the pathway to the grave.  She was so troubled for breath that it seemed as though the billows of death covered her, then she was brought back to us again, then the wave of death's cold winter would rush over her again and so the struggle went on till at last she drifted with the tide, quietly drifted into the sea of eternity.

Six children mourn her loss, we mourn with them.  She rests - regretted by a host of friends and kindred.

She died March 22, 1887, aged 73 years.

 

April 2, 1887

IN MEMORY OF

John T. GRAY, who departed this life last Sunday morning, March 27th, 1887, between the hours of nine and ten o'clock; aged 48 years.

Once more we are called upon to chronicle the death of a worthy citizen, and we do so with feelings of sympathy and compassion.  Death is no respector [sic] of persons, its grim message is waiting for us all.  One by one we see them succumb to the demands of the  unpartial master.  Many are called in their youth, others in middle age, while some are left to a good old age.  In this instance the deceased had reached the meridian of life, and he responded to the call without a word of murmuring.

Let us refer briefly to the past life of our subject.

John T. GRAY was born in Jefferson county, Ohio, and moved to this State, with his parents in 1850.  He married Miss Alice SLYE, in 1867 and for their union three children come to make their home more happy and to bring sunshine and contentment.

In 1861, at the breakout of the rebellion, Mr. GRAY was among the first to rally around the standard and take arms against a foe that threatened to destroy the Union.  His patriotism was of heroic nature, he sacrificed home and friends to go and battle for his country.  He enlisted Nov. 21st, 1861, a private in company B. 58th Illinois Infantry and was discharged Feb. 7, 1865, after a service of 38 1/2 months.  During that time he witnessed ten battles and escaped without being wounded; but the heat of the southern climate and the hardships of war bore heavily upon him and when peace had been declared and he returned to his home he was but a wreck of his former self.  Bravely did he fight the ravages of the disease, always bearing his pain and suffering with a true soldier's courage and without complaint until the last.  As a citizen he was honored and respected, a true husband and a kind and indulgent father.

The funeral took place in the M.E. Church of which he was a devout member last, Tuesday morning under the management of the G.A.R. post.  There was a large procession that followed him to his last resting place and our people one and all deeply sympathize with his widow, daughters and parents in their sad bereavement.

 

April 9, 1887

Lee BROWN was elected Supervisor at Fairfield last Tuesday.

 

April 9, 1887

TOWNSHIP ELECTION

Last Tuesday occurred our annual township election, and it was very tame indeed.  There was but one ticket in the field and that was the People's Union Ticket.  The fight was fought in the caucus tow weeks ago.  The election was the most quiet one held here for years, and never before were candidates given so easy a walk away.  Below we give the entire vote:

For Supervisor

J.F. LEONARD-109

L.K. BRAINERD-3

For Town Clerk

Geo. B. JACKSON-114

For Assessor

Job E. GREENMAN-115

For Collector

Geo. H. LUTYENS-107

H.H. DOW-3

For Commissioner of Highways

William HURLBERT-106

James CONROY-3

M.H. BREWER-2

For Constable

J.F. McNAUGHTON-110

E. CAIN-1

For School Trustee

L.L. GRIFFIN-109

 

 

June 18, 1887

Mrs. H. H. [Anjenetta] HOGEBOOM received a telegram announcing the dangerous illness of her mother [Maria (BASSETT) SYKES].  She started Tuesday for Vermont, her mother's home.

 

September 3, 1887

H. E. BROWN went to Sterling, Monday, to purchase a new engine for the Fairfield creamery.

 

September 3, 1887

School has begun and the school book and gum dealers are happy.  Girls must have gum as well as school books one seems as necessary as the other.

 

September 3, 1887

H. H. [Hiland] HOGEBOOM brought to the office of the Tornado a very large watermelon. The melon was very sweet and luscious and he has the hearty thanks of our office force for the treat.

 

September 3, 1887

H. H. [Hiland] HOGEBOOM brought in a sample of fine grapes Wednesday.  He says he has two vines that his mother [Sarah Maria HOGEBOOM] picked a washtub full from that day and his father [Noah John HOGEBOOM] was going to pick the remaining grapes the next day.

 

September 3, 1887

Our Creamery

Early last spring Mr. Geo. B. COOPER came to Tampico and looked over the ground in view of establishing a creamery in our midst.  He was so well pleased with the natural advantages of this section, for such an enterprise, that he concluded to establish a creamery here, and forth with began the section of a building for the purpose.

No sooner had his intentions become known, than reports as to his ability, financially and otherwise, were circulated, by opposition creameries, cream gatherers and others, with intention of shaking the faith of the farmers and the general public in him.  Some predicted that the creamery would never be completed.  Others that it would not run a month if it was, and hundred like stories were circulated.  But, notwithstanding, Mr. COOPER continued on.  He erected his creamery.  Sent out cream gatherers, made and shipped his butter.  With what result?  We will state, First-experienced creamery men tell us that his building is a model one, one whose equal is hard to find.  Second-he has, considering the year, received an unlooked [sic] for amount of cream.  Third-he is making an A. No. 1, butter.  An article that stands at the head of the market in Eastern cities and Chicago, in fact he has often received from 1/2 to 5 cents more a pound for his products than the quoted market reports, and his product is eagerly sought for by commission merchants.

These facts are that Mr. COOPER has lived down the untruthful reports of his enemies, has proven himself to be an expert butter maker, an untiring worker and has placed his creamery upon a firm and solid basis, and is getting to the front, defamatory reports to the contrary notwithstanding.

His creamery is identical to the interests of Tampico and the country adjacent thereto, and it behooves us all individually and collectively, to stand by him and encourage and render assistance whenever occasions are presented.  We want the creamery, the farmers want a place to sell their cream where they can get the top marked price, which they receive of him.

Mr. COOPER is deserving of great credit for the success he has attained, starting has he did under such unfavorable circumstances, he has overcome every obstacle met, he gained the confidence of the public and his business is on the increase, and the day has come when Tampiconians [sic] can truthfully boast of having as good a creamery as can be found in the land.

 

September 10, 1887

The Sodtown and Tampico clubs played a game of ball here last Saturday afternoon.  Five innings were played, and, as a matter of course the Tampico boys led by a large score.  Tampico ball players are hard to beat, you bet.

 

September 17, 1887

B. E. [Byron] HOGEBOOM called on the Tornado Wednesday and paid for his paper until 1888.  The HOGEBOOMs, one and all, are substantial patrons of this paper, four of them are upon our list and each one of them has paid for, from one to four papers, since the paper started.  Such friends we appreciate.

 

September 17, 1887

H.E. BROWN is the happy father of a nice young daughter, who came to preside over his household last Wednesday evening.

 

September 17, 1887

Mrs. MORSE, nee ALDRICH, was quite seriously ill this week with hay fever.  She choked up very badly which threw her into convulsion.  She is now somewhat better, yet quite ill.

 

September 17, 1887

The Supreme Court of Illinois enters a ruling against the Anarchists:  SPIES, ECHWAB, LING, FIELDEN, PARSONS, and ENGLE to be hanged.  The date of the execution November 11th, 1887.

 

September 17, 1887

Buffalo Bill is getting tired of foreign pomp and aristocracy and longs for a ramble on the broad prairies of the West.

 

September 17, 1887

The Chicago Exposition is in full blast now.

 

September 17, 1887

Married DOW-SMITH  At the residence of  Joseph [Joseph & Roxanna nee DOW] KEMP, Tampico, Ill., on Saturday, September 10th, 1887, Mr. Thomas DOW, of Tampico and Mrs. Belinda SMITH, of Prophetstown.

 

September 24, 1887

Mrs. C.E. ALDRICH and son, Wayne, are at Woodstock visiting relatives.  They left Tuesday and will be absent some time.

 

September 24, 1887

Kane county is greatly exercised over the fact that a real live panther is roaming at will over her broad domains.  The animal was last seen near Elgin.

 

October 1, 1887

B. E. [Byron] HOGEBOOM was in town last Saturday night and drove home with a bran [sic] new harness for his horses.

 

October 1, 1887

H. H. [Tip] DOW has had his house refitted.  Having taken off the siding and put on felt paper and then replacing the siding.  He will paint the exterior of the building.

 

October 1, 1887

H. H. [Hiland] HOGEBOOM came smiling into our office last Thursday lugging three mammoth turnips, any one of which would make a square meal for a good sized family.  He deposited his load and took out his pocket-book, remarking, "I guess it's about time to pay a little on my subscription, first I will pay for my own, next for Norman SYKES [his father-in-law], of Dorset, Vt., and for J.E. McNAUGHTON [probably the father-in-law of his uncle Alvah HOGEBOOM], the other paper I pay for is not near due yet."  Such visitors are fully appreciated by this office.

 

October 1, 1887

We will risk the assertion that there are few towns in Illinois that can boast of as many lady proprietors and clerks engaged in stores as there are in Tampico at the present time.  To prove we will enumerate them, starting with Mrs. J.T. GRAY, and her daughters, Allie, Lillian, and Maude.  Next Mrs. J.E. GREENMAN, Miss L.L. HIGDAY, Mrs. J.C. PINKLEY, Mrs. Burt GREENMAN, Mrs. D.P. ALDRICH and her three daughters Addie, Jennie and Elma.  This comprises the number on the West side of Main street.  Now we will enumerate those on the east side of the street; Mrs. J.S. WILLET and daughter, Hannah, Mrs. J.C PAICE, Mrs. W.H. HARRISON, Miss Mary GLASSBURN, Misses Jennie MAXFIELD & Anna POWELL and Miss Minnie MELVIN.  Twenty all told.

 

October 8, 1887

N. LUTYENS and wife and daughter, Mrs. BRAINERD returned last week from their visit to the Fox river country.  Nicholas reports that crops in that vicinity are very light and says that the farmers of this section should be very thankful for the abundant crops, for he says they are very good when compared with crops of other localities.

 

October 8, 1887

Job GREENMAN is at work writing the WILLET's biography.

 

October 15, 1887

Hunter's Round Trip Tickets

from Chicago to Ellis Junction, Wausaukee, Pike and Pembine River, Wis., at $12.50, and Iron Mountain, Mich., $13.10, good to return until Dec. 31st, can be obtained of W.W. TABBERNER, General Agent Milwaukee & Northern Railroad, 55 S. Clark St. Chicago.

 

October 29, 1887

Tom DOW [H.H. "Tip" DOW's brother] is buying poultry here for J. F. WARNER of Prophetstown.

 

October 29, 1887

Oats are selling for 21 to 24 cents per bushel.

 

October 29, 1887

The Treasury Department will issue no more silver certificates or other paper currency in denominations below $5.  The old $1 bills will continue to have a warm place in the modest pocket-book until they are worn out.

 

October 29, 1887

It costs $5,125 an hour to run the city of New York.

 

November 5, 1887

Monday night was the girls' night out and they were bound to howl.

 

November 5, 1887

Burt GREENMAN gave us an order for some new stationary this week.  He intends to let the public know that he is still on earth and awake to the signs of the times.

 

November 5, 1887

J.F. McNAUGHTON, proprietor of the Tampico House, dropped  in upon us the other day and treated the office to the cigars.  He said they were a new brand, the Dona Rosa, and wished for us to sample them.  We found them good ones too.

 

November 5, 1887

Hallowe'en was observed by the young folks of this place.  The fruits of their work was plainly visible the next morning.  Signs were changed, the sidewalk strewn with tile, door ways filled with boxes, boards, etc.  The young folks claim to have a good time; but their demonstrations were a little on the mischievous order.

 

November 5, 1887

Married - Mr. Frank BALDWIN and Miss Allie LANE in Clinton, IA, Thursday last.

 

November 5, 1887

Died at the residence of Joseph KEMP, in Tampico, Ill., Wednesday, November 2, 1887, Mrs. Susan Gray DOW aged 81 years. [Susan was the wife of Thomas Jefferson DOW (Whitcher's brother), dau of Chauncy and Polly GRAY and mother of Roxana, Joseph's wife.  ]

 

November 12, 1887

Miss Maud DOW took the train for Dakota last Wednesday noon.  [Based upon grave records for Tampico, it appears Maud (11/28/1865-7/19/1939) may have married Leslie W. DENISON (10/29/1863-12/22/1948).]

 

November 12, 1887

Attorney O.F. WOODRUFF, of Morrison, was in Chicago last week and began fifty-two suits in the United States Court against as many defendants---principally residents of Prophetstown, Portland, and Fulton townships, this county, who refused to pay the "drive-well" royalty demanded by the agent a few weeks ago; in all the cases but one $2,000 damages are claimed, the one being $4,000.   Each suit is brought in the name of William D. ANDERSON & Bros. representing the patentee.  The following is the list of defendants:

Andrew FERRIS                    George CARPENTER

Geo. HITCHCOCK               Orrin T. ALLEN

Richard THOMPSON                        George DERBY

Jabez WARNER                     Frank HADWAY

George FALTER                    Daniel LEASHE

Ed S. GAGE                           Edwin LANCASTER

Charles LANCASTER           Theodore BEARDSLEE

John ELLSWORTH               Samuel THOMPSON

Samuel FIELD                        John ROSE

Henry C. FELLOWS              Charles Y. WHEELER

Ruben M. THOMPSON         John R. THOMPSON

William BOOTH                     William KEEFER

John RICHARDS                   Simon RICHARDS

Fane THOMPSON                 Wm. R. McKENZIE

Julius BAKER                                    William BURTMAN

Simeon WALTERS                A.E. LOOMIS

William HILL                         Ezra HILL

Samuel SIMPSON                  Luther McKENZIE

William TABOR                     Milton WOODARD

Andrew J. WARNER             Mike CARNEY

Mike THEO                            Levi HOPKINS

Geo. P. RICHMOND             Charles ADAMS

Orrin PADDOCK                   Silas W. LANGDON

Nathan THOMPSON             William FARRELL

Emmet UNDERHILL                        Sherman G. BALDWIN

John DYER

 

November 19, 1887

There was rejoicing along this line Tuesday when word was received from E.A. HOVEY that the "Driven-Well" suit in the U.S. Supreme Court had been decided against the patentee.  A banner was made upon which was painted , in large letters the telegram announcing the fact, which was hung across Main street.

 

December 3, 1887

Mrs. J.E. GREENMAN, who has been so seriously ill with malarial fever, is slowly convaleacing [sic]; and Mr. GREENMAN, who was taken with the same disease Monday is reported to be getting better.

 

December 17, 1887

Miss Edith McKENZIE, of Yorktown, called upon the Tornado office last Thursday and renewed her subscription for 1888.

 

December 17, 1887

MARRIED

OLSSON - ALDRICH- In Sterling, Sunday, Dec., 11th, 1887, by Rev. PARKER, Mr. John OLSSON and Miss Addie ALDRICH, both of Tampico.

 

December 17, 1887

Mr. Joseph KEMP tells us he has just completed the building of one of the largest, if not the largest barn in Whiteside county.  The barn is Mr. WILKINSON's who resides two miles west of the Hume school house, and is 62 x 132 feet on the ground with main parts 24 feet high.

 

December 24, 1887

Rumor says that Emmet HOGEBOOM has purchased the MELVIN store in New Bedford.  Well; we are glad to hear of his new adventure, and think he will make a thorough going merchant and hope he will succeed even beyond his expectations.

 

December 24, 1887

Job GREENMAN is reported as recovered from the Malaria; but is seriously troubled with rheumatism.

 

December 24, 1887

Stiles H. Pierce is at work in the Walnut Depot.  He is brushing up a little telegraphy and jerking baggage, expecting soon to get the station.

 

December 31, 1887

A Word of Our Business Men.

This year has been, to most of us, a prosperous one.  The Tornado has, with the rest of the business institutions of Tampico, been blessed with a liberal patronage, both at home and abroad, and for such recognition makes us feel happy and thankful to those who have used our columns so freely to advance their own interests in a business way....Before another issue of the Tornado the new year will be with us, and we deem it proper and in keeping with the times to give each branch of business a complimentary notice...to the fact that Tampico is a live town and well represented by enterprising business firms.

 

J.W. GLASSBURN & Son.

This firm is engaged in the banking business and deal extensively in grain, stock, coal, etc.

 

XXX STILMAN

Holds forth in the "Little Store on the Corner" and deals in dry goods, groceries, etc.

 

T.M. WYLIE

Deals in hardware, agricultural implements, wagons, buggies, etc.

 

Chas. BURDEN

Deals in groceries, boots, shoes, and gent's furnishings

 

Misses MAXFIELD & POWELL

Are conducting a first-class restaurant on the east side of Main street

 

Mrs. J.T. GRAY

In the proprietress [sic] of a grocery store

 

O.B. NELSON

Manufacturing boots and shoes, does a thriving business, is a skilled workman

 

J.E. GREENMAN & Son

Keep a grocery store

 

Miss Mary J. GLASSBURN

Postmistress [sic], also a dealer in stationary, books, and notions

 

Miss L.L. HIGDAY

Is engaged in the millenary trade and keeps a full line of hats, bonnets, trimmings and ladies' furnishing goods

 

W.H. HARRISON

Deals in dry goods, groceries, shoes, boots, etc.

 

Alf. SMITH & Bro.

These gentlemen deal extensively in hardware, agricultural implements, wagons, buggies, etc.

 

J.C. PAICE

Proprietor of the "Cash Discount Store," deals in groceries, dry goods, boots, shoes, etc.

 

FORWARD & Son

Butchers, have been engaged in the business here for years and at present George is to be found at the shop

 

B.D. GREENMAN

Druggist, is the proprietor of the only drug store in town.  He carries a large line of drugs, trusses, books, stationary, notions, etc.

 

Geo. M. LUTYENS

Our watch maker and jeweler, carries a full line of the best goods

 

Geo. H. JACKSON

Tonsorial [sic] artist, serves the public with his leather, razor and shears in a knightly fashion

 

J.F. LEONARD

Our worthy Supervisor, holds the office of Justice of the Peace, and represents good solid insurance companies

 

J. C. PINKLEY

Our urban station agent

 

A.C. SMITH

Physician and surgeon, has long practiced in this vicinity

 

GIFFORD & Son

Handle sewing machines and sewing machine supplies

 

T. HOGUE

Police Justice and manufacturer of brooms, deals out justice to the men and brooms to the ladies

 

Wm. HACKETT

Mason

 

Wm. ROWE

Mason

 

HURLBERT and LOVE

Stock buyers

 

Rosedale Creamery

Geo. B. COOPER proprietor

 

H. W. MOSES

Deals in poultry

 

Wm. METCALF

Carpenter and builder

 

Joseph KEMP

Contractor and builder

 

MACOMBER & EMMONS

The two "Eds," are engaged in the hay and straw pressing business

 

C.R. ALDRICH

Keeps a first-class livery and feed stable

 

D. McMILLEN

Deals in lumber, coal, lime, etc.

 

WINTER & ALLEN

Painters

 

A. J. MAXFIELD

Runs a blacksmith shop

 

Robert COLLINS

Blacksmith and machinist

 

J.A. TEACH

General blacksmith

 

Nicholas DERDINGER

Harness maker and dealer in horse furnishing goods

 

M.L. FREGOE

Deals in pumps, and gives special attention to putting up windmills, repairing pumps, etc.

 

C. SMITH

Proprietor of our furniture store

 

Mrs. D. F. ALDRICH

Deals in millenary goods and carries on the dress making business

 

J.S. WILLET

Caters to the wants of his many callers at his grocery store

 

J.W. WHITE

Our representative, also holds office next door to LEONARD's, where he deals out law to all

 

M.G. LOVE

Insurance agent

 

F.H. RICHARDSON

Insurance agent

 

H.N. BROWN

Insurance agent

 

Union Hall

CAIN & JACKSON proprietors, is a popular resort for the lovers of the merry dance, exhibitions, theatres [sic], public speeches or lectures

 

City Hotel

T.O. STEADMAN proprietor, is located on Main street and is highly spoken of by the traveling public

 

Tampico House

J.F. McNAUGHTON proprietor, is the oldest house of the place

 

Goodell House

Mrs. S.R. GOODELL [GOODALE?] proprietress [sic]

 

M.E. Church

Robert BELL pastor

 

Baptist Church

Is at present without a permanent pastor

 

St. Mary's Church

Is under the supervision of Father SULLIVAN

 

Public Schools

Prof. F.S. JOHNSON, principal, Miss Ellen DENISON, teacher of the Intermediate department, and Miss Jennie MAXFIELD of the primary department

TAMPICO AREA HISTORICAL SOCIETY - MUSEUM - FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY/RESEARCH CENTER  119 Main St., P. O. Box 154,  Tampico, IL  61283   www.tampicohistoricalsociety.com   tampicohistoricalsociety@gmail.com  President Joan Johnson, 815-438-7581 or garyjoan@thewisp.net  Family History Coordinator, Denise McLoughlin 815-590-2143. We are an all-volunteer organization so your donations are always appreciated!  Sign up to receive our e-newsletter. Thank you!  Visit us on FACEBOOK, too.