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Articles & Local History > 1888 - Tampico Tornado Gossip Column Jan. 7 - Nov. 17, 1888

Transcribed & Submitted by Les Niemi

January 7, 1888

On Geo. H. LUTYENS' 5 and 10 cent counters may be found many useful articles in tinware [sic], woodenware, iron and steel tools, and many other articles of a useful and ornamental character.  He has had a nice trade since the addition of this feature to his business and feels encouraged that he has added many new goods.

 

January 7, 1888

H.H. DOW, who has been engaged in the lumber yard for the past several years is now taking a lay-off.

 

January 7, 1888

Job GREENMAN is still confined to the house with rheumatism.

 

January 7, 1888

Oliver McKENZIE shipped a lot of fat cattle from here to Chicago this week.

 

January 7, 1888

Robert WROTEN has a span of four-year-old colts for sale.

 

January 7, 1888

Herbert KEMP is the quickest workman we have seen hold of a hammer and saw lately.  And you bet that he does his work well and it will stand the closest scrunity [sic].

 

April 7, 1888

Elections:

There was but little stir on our streets Tuesday that was demonstrative of the fact that an election was taking place.  There were but few workers and everything was quiet.  There were 151 votes polled and the results were as follows:

Supervisor - J.F. LEONARD 148

Town Clerk - Geo. B. JACKSON 146

Assessor - Job E. GREENMAN 151

Collector - Geo. H. LUTYENS 149

Com. Highways - Barney McGRADY 76

   "            "        - Frank B. THOMAS 75

School Trustee - John S. KIMBALL 150

Constable - T.O. STEADMAN 145

 

Fairfield [Yorktown]

Supervisor - L.W. BROWN

Town Clerk - Henry COOLEY

Assessor - J. E. BONKER

Collector - Thos. BERGE

Commissioner of Highways - Swan MUNSON

 

April 7, 1888

Breaded Potatoes:  Boil potatoes in their skins until done, but not too soft.  Peel them, cut them in thick slices, dip them in a beaten egg and roll them in fine bread or zwieback crumbs.  Fry the slices in hot butter or drippings until they are golden brown and serve.

 

April 21, 1888

Ray McKENZIE lost a valuable horse several days ago.  He found the animal in the morning with his head under the manager clear gone dead.

 

April 21, 1888

Miss Edith McKENZIE, arrived home from Iowa, last Saturday.

 

April 21, 1888

The Dutch measles are very prevalent here.  Most of the children have or are having them.  They are making sad havoc with the attendance of the school.  In the Grammar Department there were only eighty students present one day this week.

 

April 21, 1888

From Yorktown - Pleasant DOW [Lauer's brother] is back from Chicago, to visit Pa.  He is now down with Dutch Measles.

 

No April 28, 1888 Newspaper Microfilmed

 

May 5, 1888

88 degrees above zero Saturday, and Sunday morning 32 degrees.  A change of 56 degrees in twenty-four hours.

 

May 5, 1888

The Chicago, Burlington & Quincey strike was Wednesday, officially declared "off".  The Brotherhood of Engineers will ruefully regard the result of this ill-advised strike.

 

May 5, 1888

The dog poisoning season opened up here last Wednesday with the death of a poor canine.  If you have a grudge on grievance against a person it is an underhanded way of settling the difficulty, by poisoning his dog.

 

May 5, 1888

Obituary

Anna L. BROWNE was born in Prophetstown township, Whiteside county, Illinois, September 21, 1862.  Her parents were Van S. and Ann E. BASTIAN.  Her father died when she was but eleven years of age, and at that time living near Yorktown, Bureau county, Illinois.  Her mother died when she was sixteen years of age and living at Tampico, Illinois.  Left at the age of eleven with no father to protect, support and educate her, and while yet a child, left without the loving, watchful care of a mother, her life was been a greater battle than the usual life in this age and Nation.  After the death of her mother, almost unaided she supported and educated herself.  She commenced teaching school when but seventeen years of age and continued her studies till she was well fitted for a teacher.  She was a teacher for several terms in each of the graded schools at Tampico and Prophetstown.  In 1879, while at Tampico she became a member of the Baptist Church and took an active interest as teacher in Sunday school.  August 4, 1886, she married Eric P. BROWNE, of Prophetstown.  To them was born a girl April 27, 1888.  She was living a useful, happy, contented life in her little home with a loving husband, surrounded with kind friends, many of whom had known her from childhood.  She was ambitious and energetic.  She died Friday, April 27th, 1888, leaving a husband, an infant daughter, three brothers and six sisters.  The obsequies [sic] were held in the M.E. Church in Prophetstown, Sunday, April 29th.

 

May 12, 1888

Wolves seem to be getting more plenty [sic] around here, as there has been quite a number seen lately west of town.

 

May 12, 1888

The Mississippi is still rising and fears are entertained that there will be great damage done.  If the rain continues it will no doubt attain the height it was in 1880.  Already a great amount of damage has been done.

 

May 19, 1888

Herbert KEMP started for Chicago, Tuesday, where he goes to hunt work.  Herbert is a skilled carpenter and will no doubt find a job that will suit him.

 

May 19, 1888

Oatmeal Cookies:  One cup of sugar, two eggs, on cup of flour, on cup of cold boiled oatmeal, one teaspoon of soda, two teaspoons of cream tartar, on tablespoon butter; roll thin and bake in a quick oven.

 

May 19, 1888

Farmers' Cake:  Take one cup of sugar, one cup of sour cream, two small cups of flour, one egg and one teaspoon of soda dissolved in warm water and stirred in last very briskly.  Flavor with nutmeg.

 

May 26, 1888

Tip [H. H.] DOW says we can shake hands and bid farewell to the Republican Party of this state now, for her mission is ended.

 

May 26, 1888

Fred ALLEN has finished painting the Hume school house.  He done a good job, one that all are satisfied with.

 

June 2, 1888

A Milk Shake.  Yes, and the place to get one is at Misses MAXFIELD & POWELL's.  These enterprising ladies have put in a fine shaker and are concocting a fine a drink as ever tickled the palate of a human.

 

 

 

June 9, 1888

Joel M. BALDWIN who lives on the GIBSON farm has had his pension raised from $30 to $50 per month.

 

June 9, 1888

James WOODARD is laid up for repairs with a felon on his fore-finger of his left hand.  He says it causes him much pain and restless nights.

 

June 9, 1888

Oliver McKENZIE shipped two carloads of hogs from this place Tuesday.  He had the misfortune of losing two of the largest of them by being overheated during the drive here.

 

June 9, 1888

The Two Eds [Ed EMMONS & McCOMBER] started out with their steamer and hay press for Yorktown early Monday morning. They have hay to press there, at WOODARD's bluff and at Prophetstown.

 

June 16, 1888

Mrs. H.H. [Tip] DOW took the morning train Thursday to Minier, Ill., where she will visit with her daughter for a short time.  Mr. DOW will follow her in about a week or so and they will return together.

 

June 23, 1888

Miss Clara PIERCE of N.Y. is at present visiting parents and relatives at Yorktown and vicinity.

 

June 30, 1888

H.H. DOW has gone to Minier, Ill., for a short visit.

 

June 30, 1888

Gen. Benjamin HARRISON of Indiana, for President, and Levi P. MORTON, of New York, for Vice-President are the Republican nominees. Now that the nominations are over each party will get down to work and get their candidates to the front.

 

June 30, 1888

W.D. EDISON of Philadelphia visited the Rosedale creamery [in Tampico] last Wednesday.  Mr. EDISON controls a large trade in choice creamery butter in the Philadelpia market, and the butter shipped from "Rosedale" leads all the rest.

 

June 30, 1888

During his visit to Spring Valley Joseph KEMP purchased a business lot, upon which he will erect a store building soon.

 

July 7, 1888

Carpenters - Bids will be received by the directors of the Hume Center school for repairs upon the school building.  A new roof, a hardwood floor and other slight repairs. - Chas. E. LANE

 

July 21, 1888

Hi McKENZIE says there are but two parties "the Republicans and the rebel."

 

July 21, 1888

Joseph KEMP went to Spring Valley Monday to pay his money and get a deed of the business lot he lately bargained for.

 

July 21, 1888

Stiles PIERCE, station agent at VanORIN, with his wife and children came here Wednesday to make his brother Allie PIERCE and family a visit.  They started for Dakota Thursday.

 

July 21, 1888

Mr. Rufus ALDRICH and Mrs. MORSE [nee ALDRICH], accompanied by May MEYERS, left here on Monday for a visit with John H. ALDRICH at Gutherie Center, Iowa.

 

 

August 18, 1888

James WOODARD who had a felon on his thumb, and has been laid up all summer thereby, had the thumb amputated last week.

 

September 8, 1888

Tom DOW hurrahs for Harrison and Morton now days.

 

September 8, 1888

H.H. [Tip] DOW came into our sanctum Monday and handed us a $1.50 for more Tornados.

 

September 22, 1888

Mr. WOODARD built a barn back of his store this week.

 

September 29, 1888

Mrs. H. H. [Tip] DOW fell down stairs last Sunday and broke her collar bone.  She is doing as well as circumstances will admit.

 

September 29, 1888

We return thanks to H. H. [Hiland] HOGEBOOM for the pail of fine palatable grapes which he left at the Tornado office last Saturday.

 

September 29, 1888

A brass band was organized here last Saturday evening with nine members.  The boys will purchase new instruments.  The organization is composed mostly of young men and will no doubt branch into a full fledged band.  The following are members:  T.O. STEADMAN, J.H.. OLSSON, Leslie DENISON, Levi LUTYENS, Chas. WEST, Frank WEST, Harry GIFFORD, Nobel FARRIS, and Fred ALLEN.  You will probably hear from them in the future.

 

October 6, 1888

Fred ALLEN and George WINTER are painting the residence of Frank O'NEIL at Deer Grove.

 

October 6, 1888

Oat DOW who was recently married was serenaded with tin pan music at Walnut after his marriage and the fellows who had a hand in it were arrested and fined.

 

October 6, 1888

F.E. ANDREWS of Sterling made a prohibition address in Union Hall last Saturday evening.  The attendance was rather fair and fluctuating. Mr. ANDREWS spoke at some length on prohibition and made some hits on the "two old parties."  After his address Mrs. S. T. SHIRLEY spoke for a time.

 

October 6, 1888

A special meeting of the Y.W.C.T.U. will be held in the home of Miss Maggie McNAUGHTON next Tuesday evening.

 

November 17,1888

Married - Wm. WINCHELL and Miss Nettie L. McKENZIE

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