Welcome to Tampico, Illinois
Articles & Local History > 1889 - Jan. 5 - April 27, Tampico Tornado Gossip Column

Transcribed & Submitted by Les Niemi

January 5, 1889

Mrs. [Nettie] WINCHELL of Aurora made her parents Mr. and Mrs. Hi McKENZIE of Fairfield a visit holiday week.

 

January 5, 1889

If all very well

For people to tell

Of the lands of the lotus and Lizard,

But it shrivels as all

When down from St. Paul

Comes the blast of the blustering blizzard.

 

January 5, 1889

Use DeLAND’s Soda.

 

January 5, 1889

Try WILLETTS 1.30 Flour.

 

January 5, 1889

SMITH Brothers are busy this week invoicing.

 

January 5, 1889

Lots of Blankets and comforters for 90 per pair at HARRISON’s.

 

January 5, 1889

BLOSSOM’s is the place to go for Jewelry, Sterling, Ill.  Call on him.

 

January 5, 1889

Union meetings during the evenings of next week at the M.E. Church.

 

January 5, 1889

A good many carloads of corn are being shipped from here of late.

 

January 5, 1889

Jerd ROGERS and James McBRIDE made the Garden City a visit this week.

 

January 5, 1889

Go to FERRIS for the choicest brands of Tea and Coffee.  Good 30 cent tea.

 

January 5, 1889

Prophetstown has invested in a $1,500 apparatus for protection in case of fire.

 

January 5, 1889

A full line of Garland cook and heating stoves, at Alf. SMITH & Bro’s.  Call and see them.

 

January 5, 1889

What is the use of paying cost for Goods when you can get them for less at HARRISON’s.

 

January 5, 1889

Misses Blanche WYLIE and Eva SMITH have returned to their studies at the Aurora college.

 

January 5, 1889

Quite a number from this place went to Sterling Wednesday to attend the horse market.

 

January 5, 1889

Remember the G.A.R. installation and oyster supper takes place at Union Hall Saturday night.

 

January 5, 1889

About ever person you met January 1st had a smoked glass observing the eclipse of the sun.

 

January 5, 1889

Evaporated Blackberries at WILLETTS.

 

January 5, 1889

Mrs. WINCHELL of Aurora made her parents Mr. and Mrs. Hi McKENZIE of Fairfield a visit holiday week.

 

January 5, 1889

Mrs. A.C. SMITH gave a New Year’s dinner to which was invited a number of the young men of this place.

 

January 5, 1889

T. HOGUE, who has been ill for the past week, is now somewhat better and we hope he will soon be out again.

 

January 5, 1889

All are invited to a Union Gospel meeting Sunday night at the Baptist church, Rev. BALDWIN of the M.E. church will preach.

 

January 5, 1889

James FITZGERALD had a runaway the other day and was thrown from the wagon and quite badly bruised.  No bones were broken.

 

January 5, 1889

Linas GOODALE made his wife a suitable Christmas present of a new Eldredge “B” sewing machine, which the Tornado office sold to him.

 

January 5, 1889

Misses Lillie SMITH and Phoebe PARKER were callers at the Tornado office last Thursday.  Miss SMITH called to renew her father, A.M. SMITH’s subscription.

 

January 5, 1889

A letter was received from Father McGUIRE, of Pecatonica, enclosed in which was $1.50 which shows that though absent from us he likes to hear what Tampico people are doing.

 

January 5, 1889

“Johnny stole a ham.”  This time it was a Johnny from Sterling and his surname is MILLER.  He was caught and lodged in jail to await the action of the grand jury at next term of court.

 

January 5, 1889

“A wolf!”  So rang out the exclamation among Green Riverites.  A wolf was seen in the swamps.  A party was organized and it searched for his wolf-ship’ but up to last accounts he has been seen no more.

 

January 5, 1889

The Fairfield Woodmen have taken a step in the right direction.  At their late dance some fellows came there with heavy loads of intoxication on board and were soon given the grand bounce, yes, bounced out of the hall.

 

January 5, 1889

Ab. FORWARD has moved to the country again and will try his hand at farming once more.  Geo. FORWARD will move back to his old home next week.  It will seem like old times to have Geo. for a neighbor and see him out hustling among his stock early in the morning.

 

January 5, 1889

Ladies and Misses cloaks at your own price at HARRISON’s.

 

January 5, 1889

Mr. JOHNSON’s three little girls were sliding upon the ice of Spring creek, just east of their home in Spring Valley last Monday.  The ice gave away and they received a thorough wetting..  Luckly the water was not deep or the result might have been more serious.

 

January 5, 1889

Katie POWERS, a young lady, about twenty-one years of age, who resided in Prophetstown, was taken to Kankakee asylum Monday morning by Sheriff KEEFER and Marshal SMITH of Morrison.  She had resided with a family in which a lady’s death was caused by cancer of the stomach, and she began imagining she was also afflicted with the same disease, which brooding unsettled her mind.

 

January 5, 1889

There were forty numbers out at the New Year’s dance and those present were well behaved and enjoyed themselves splendidly.

 

January 5, 1889

Dr. B.E. LaDUE and family are at present visiting old scenes and friends here.  The doctor has a fine practice in his new made home, Spring Valley, and is classed as one of the leading physicians there.

 

January 5, 1889

There will be lively scenes at Springfield next week.  We understand there are several candidates for the Speaker of the House, and the army of clerks and other appointees will be as large if not larger than ever.

 

January 5, 1889

Furniture for every body, any thing you want from a high chair to a parlor set.  A good stock of burial cases always on hand.  Call and get prices before you buy.  C. SMITH

 

January 5, 1889

W. THOMAS, of Land’s End, has been appointed Postmaster.  A new office has been created and is named Thomas and located near where STILSON’s store was at Sodtown.  A mail route has been established running from Yorktown to New Bedford via Thomas.

 

January 5, 1889

A fellow came rushing into his home breathless and excited.  As soon as he could quiet his nerves a little he exclaimed, “I tell you there must be a big row up town.  Three women espied me on the street and took after me and run me clear to the front gate, scared, am I?  Well I should say so.”

 

January 5, 1889

California Currents at WILLETTS.

 

January 5, 1889

Joseph KEMP, who has been at Spring Valley for the past week returned home Tuesday.  On his arrival he learned that his son had left that day with a car load of lumber which is to be used in the erection of a building there.  He went back the next day to begin his work.

 

January 5, 1889

You can buy men’s or boy’s overcoats regardless of cost at HARRISON’s.

 

January 5, 1889

The band boys were out serenading New Year’s night and took in the greater portions of town.  Ed. EMMONS and Alfred JOHNSON have the thanks of the band for their donation of two dollars.  The boys have not asked the citizens for a cent, but will gladly receive whatever the citizens offer to the support of the band.

 

January 5, 1889

Such weather! Did you ever see the like?  The facts are it is too nice weather for business and in some consequence all trade is sluggish and merchants are compelled to sell at low figures in order to work off their winter’s stock.  Now is the time to buy if you can afford to, for you are offered bargins that you will not have again in many years to come.

 

January 5, 1889

Our school teacher with other accomplishments is not afraid of manual labor.  He believes in good healthy exercise and practices what he believes, as is evident from the vigorous manner which he tackles his wood pile daily.  The hum of his saw is music to the ear of his neighbor’s who burn coal and do not understand the true inwardness of running a buck saw.

 

January 5, 1889

“Ninety-six” writing to the Bureau Co., News, from Gold town says:  “There has been an increased interest in the value of our lands of late.  Some parties in Philadelphia, Pa., have been suing for possession of swamp lands, in the United States Court, Judge GRESHAM presiding; A.O. WHEELER vs. Solomon C. DOTY, tax title.  Decision was rendered against the possession by tax title.  Judge GRESHAM instructed the jury that a tax title is subject to redemption at any time.”

 

January 5, 1889

Try WILLETTS 50 cent Syrup.

 

January 5, 1889

The first meeting of the Sterling horse market took place last Wednesday.  There were many horses offered for sale and a number sold, though there were not as many buyers as some expected.  It is true that all may not have been full satisfied, with the results.  They must not expect too much on the start, the enterprise is in its infancy and bids fair to become a permanent feature of Sterling’s enterprise.  More buyers may have been expected but remember this is not just the time of the year that horses are in general demand.  A month or so later will bring out the buyers and many more horses will be sold.  The next meeting will be held Wednesday Feb. 6th.

 

January 5, 1889

The citizens of New Bedford were greatly astounded Tuesday when the news spread around among them that a suicide had been committed in their midst.  A man was found hanging from one of the main beams of OBERSHELP’s tile factory.  On examination it was thought the deed was committed early Monday afternoon as he was last seen at the time.  The man was a Dane named LARSON, some forty years of age, had formerly worked in the tile factory, but later had been at work putting in tile for farmers in that vicinity.  The only cause alleged for his committing the rash act is that of financial trouble.  The coroner has been notified and the particulars if any will be learned.  Up to Wednesday noon he was still hanging as found.  Coroner MOORE of Spring Valley will hold the inquest.

 

January 5, 1889

Try WILLETS California Fruits.

 

January 5, 1889

Notice.

All parties owing me on book account are requested to call and settle as I wish to balance up my books on the first of the year.  W.H. HARRISON

 

January 5, 1889

Those Felt Boots at HARRISON’s are dandies.

 

January 5, 1889

The W.C.T.U. will meet at residence of Mrs. MAXFIELD on Friday January 11, at 3:30 p.m.

 

January 5, 1889

The newly elected officers of Yorktown Lodge No. 655 F.&A.M. for the ensuing Masonite year. Worthy Bro.s, Job E. GREENMAN, W.M., D. McMILLEN S.W., J.S. KIMBALL, J.W., J.F. LEONARD, Treasurer, Jesse VanBIBBER Secretary, J.W. WAITE, Chaplain; B.E. CANAYAN, S.D; William GREENMAN, J.D.’ Robt. COLLINS, S.S.; M.G. LVOE, J.S; Eli CAIN, Tyler; were duly installed by P.M., T.M. WYLIE, Saturday evening, Dec. 19th, 1888, after which, the Masons with their wives and friends repaired to Union Hall and partook of a very fine supper, prepared for the occasion by T.O. STEADMAN and was relished by all present.

 

January 5, 1889

Old Fashioned School.

The old fashioned school district school entertainment given in Union Hall, Friday evening, Dec. 28th, 1888, by the ladies of the M.E. Aid Society was a success financially and socially.  The band played several pieces before the entertainment to the audience in good humor.  And at about seven o’clock ye district school teacher came on the stage, where the interior of an old fashioned school house was represented and knocked on the desk, at which about twenty-five scholars between the ages of 30 and 60 years came in the school house and after a good deal of scuffling and delay took their places on the benches.  The school was called to order and addressed by Prof. TUTTLE who took the character of district school teacher.  Then followed the roll-call with its list of long jawbreaking names and the excuses offered by those present for those absent.  Then came the representation of a district school in session with the whispering and gum-chewing accompaniement [sic] which created laughter and amusement.  One feature of the forenoon session was when Mrs. Fred SMITH came leading grand-pa BOOTH in the room introducing him as her little brother Johnnie, four years old.  Another feature was the singing lead by Fred SMITH or Timothy TICKLEBREECHES.  Hon. J.W. WHITE took the part of the leader of the school and in spelling kept the head.  John KIMBALL took the part of cutup which he did to perfection.  In fact all of the characteristics were well taken.  At recess the gentlemen or boys we should say played leap-frog while the girls were studying.  And then the girls were excused and the boys called in.  The declamations and dialogues of the following order were spoken:  “Little drops of water,” “Twinkle, twinkle little star,” “May I go to school with brother Charles to-day,” etc.  The last act was where the school board complains of the teachers being to [sic] strict and newfangled in his method of teaching and was, after considerable reproval by the honorable board, discharged and another hired who die not believe in grammar and had no new-fangled notions, who believed gum-chewing and art.  Those present enjoyed many a hearty laugh and were well satisfied with the entertainment.  The proceeds of the evening were $34.00.

 

January 5, 1889

The residence of J.V. McCARTY was burglarized last Sunday morning and a valuable gold watch and chain belongings to Mrs. McCARTY taken.  Entrance was affected by turning the front door key with pincers.  It is hoped that the thief will not escape. – Rock Falls News.

 

January 5, 1889

MARRIED.

SCHWENNIGER-BROOK – At the residence of the bride’s father, Rev. John BROOK, in Tampico, on Tuesday, Jan., 1st, 1889, by Rev. D.H. SNYDER, of New Bedford, Mr. Matthew SCHMENINGER and Miss Emma M. BROOK.

The bride has our thanks of a supply of wedding cake.  The happy couple received numerous useful gifts.

 

January 5, 1889

Notice.

Those owing me on book account will please call and settle immediately.  As I wish to square all accounts.  J.A. TEACH.

 

January 5, 1889

Millinery.

Cheap goods, felt hate any quality of style for 50 cents at Miss HIGDAY’s.

 

January 5, 1889

Tax Notice.

I have received the tax books and am ready to receive money on your taxes.  Geo. H. LUTYENS.

 

January 5, 1889

I have a nice line of Mufflers, Ties, Ruches, silk, linen and lace handkerchiefs and tamped goods selling cheap.  L.L. HIGDAY.

 

January 5, 1889

SCHOOL LAND SALE.

The School Trustees of the Township of Tampico will sell to the highest bidder, on Saturday, February 2nd, 1889, between one and two o’clock in the afternoon, on the premises here described to wit:  The southwest one fourth (1/4) of the southeast quarter (1/4) of Section 28, Town 19, Range 6, being a part of the Courtland BROWN farm, situated three miles southwest of Tampico.

Terms of Sale – One-third Cash, the remainder on five years time at 7 per cent. interest; possession given March 1st, 1889.  For further particulars enquire of D. McMILLEN, Tampico, Ill.

 

January 5, 1889

Although Italy has the highest murder rate of any country in Europe it has abolished capital punishment.

 

January 5, 1889

Micajah HENLEY, the man who invented roller skates, lives in Richmond, Ind.  He was a poor sawyer, and it took nearly his last dollar to pay for his patent, but the craze for skating that spread over the country made him rich.

 

January 5, 1889

OBITUARY.

Mr. Marcus THACKABERRY, born April 25th, 1817, in the city of Athy in Queens county Ireland.  Was married to Mary GREGG in the city of Doublin, on the 9th day of February 1846, and came to America that same year.  After four years residence in Hertford, Conn., moved to Philadelphia, Pa., and thence to Princeton in the spring of 1853 since which time he has been a resident of Bureau county and for over thirty years a resident of Fairfield Township.  Died on the morning of Dec. 19th 1888.  Mr. THACKABERRY had been a resident of Fairfield, Bureau county, Ill. for 30 years and was claimed to be an old settler, his energy and persevering industry placed him as an example for his neighbors his door was ever open, his welcome ever hearty, his and ever outreached to assist the needy.  Through many years he as followed the path which has at last lead him to a perfect day.  For the two years of his life he has been a patient sufferer waiting only for the summons which should be his release.  In the words of another as a tribute to his memory he had lived a full life he has had his trials but he bore them as became a man who trusted to God, and he had lived to see his sons fill positions of influence, his daughter had proved a blessing thus surrounded with all the earth’s riches and blessings.  With the dear wife by him, the dash water of death had closed around him and at last after hours of struggling and battling for breath, it was given in him to look calmly fourth from the casement out on the beautiful earth, then in face of Brother, wife and children, there to close his eyes and peacefully pass away.  In the words of another as a tribute to his memory, “This is a loss which we cannot fully appreciate as yet it is too great.”  The funeral services were attended by a large number of his old friends and his brother Masons laid him away with many a sigh.  The husky voice the quietly falling tear showed that they had a friend.

A good man dies – but God still lives,

But death is but the stepping

Out from the darkness into light,

Not losing or forgetting,

Then let him sleep in his honored tomb

And cover him over with flowers

And speak in praise of noble ways

He brightened this life of ours.  H.

 

January 5, 1889

Card of Thanks.

To those who kindly assisted us in caring for our beloved father and husband both during his last illness and in laying him to rest, and also to those who through respect for his memory closed their schools, we tender our sincere thanks.  Mrs. Mary THACKABERRY and Family.

 

January 5, 1889

School Report.

Report of the WEST school for the month ending Dec. 24th, 1888.

No. days of school, 20; No. of boys enrolled, 16; no. of girls enrolled, 13; average daily attendance, 27.7; half days lost, 3; no. neither absent nor tardy, 23; visitors, 3.

Names of pupils on the roll of honor:  Belle BOGART, Mary BOGART, Ella BOGART, Sadie BOGART, Jas. BLACK, Willie BLACK, Frank BLACK, Lockie BLACK, Chas. KELLET, Ralph McGRADY, Wm. McGRADY, Bert McGRADY, Pearlie McGRADY, Nellie MOSIER, Mamie MOSIER, Jno. NEEDHAM, Anna NEEDHAM, Gracie NEEDHAM, Lewis WINCHELL, Ethal WEST, Frank WEST.  For two years Ethel WEST.  Jno. H. FEE, Teacher.

 

January 12, 1889

The mumps have struck Sterling.  Keep them there.

 

January 12, 1889

The CONROYs have moved into the residence they purchased from E.A. LaDUE.

 

January 12, 1889

Tom CONROY is the first man we saw out with a cutter this year.

 

January 12, 1889

Go to FERRIS for the choicest brands of Tea and Coffee.  Good 30 cent tea.

 

January 12, 1889

Ed. WHITE has taken up his abode in the house just opposite ye editor’s domicile.

 

January 12, 1889

Mercury dropped down to zero Thursday night.  It begins to appear wintery like.

 

January 12, 1889

Lots of Blankets and comforters for 90 per pair at HARRISON’s.

 

January 12, 1889

E.C. DAVIS, of Trenton, Neb., is at present visiting friends and relatives in this vicinity.

 

January 12, 1889

Miss Etta TILDEN, of Normal, Ill., visited with her sister Mrs. M.L. WASHBURNE this week.

 

January 12, 1889

J.C. REEVES goes to Walnut Saturday to install the officers of the G.A.R. Post of that place.

 

January 12, 1889

There is plenty of snow yet it has drifted so badly that the sleighing is nothing to brag of.

 

January 12, 1889

Samuel ADAMS gave us a call Tuesday and had the tag on his paper changed to read Dec 1889.

 

January 12, 1889

The blizzard hat struck us with a vengeance of the thought of which makes ones blood cold – almost.

 

January 12, 1889

The Prohibition club will meet at the residence of Mrs. A.C. SMITH Tuesday evening, January 15.

 

January 12, 1889

John H. JOHNSON called upon us Thursday and had his name enrolled upon our subscription book of 1889.

 

January 12, 1889

The Erie Independent has changed hands again.  O.D. HANNEN retires and W.M. PATRICK, former editor assumes control.

 

January 12, 1889

We have lost the key to our office.  Anyone finding the same and returning it to this office will be suitably rewarded.

 

January 12, 1889

Mrs. J.W. WHITE went to Rock Falls Monday to make her parents a visit during the absence of Mr. WHITE at Springfield.

 

January 12, 1889

Poultry brought a good price in this market last Saturday.  We hear that they were paying eight cents per pound for chickens.

 

January 12, 1889

A rain storm visited us Monday night.  The rain froze as it fell and made things slippery.  Pedestrians walked as though treading on glass.

 

January 12, 1889

James H. CAIN, who has been absent from home for several months, returned Wednesday.  He says he visited Texas and Nebraska during his absence.

 

January 12, 1889

J.H. ROBINSON, of Walnut, was elected door keeper of the House.  We are glad he was successful, for he is a deserving man and with all a one-armed soldier.

 

January 12, 1889

FREGOE & JARVIS put down a well in front of PAICE and HARRISON’s brick this week for the city.  The pump is a large one and will be handy and useful in case of a fire in that neighborhood.

 

January 12, 1889

The BARNES’ Readers have been placed in our schools.  This is a step in the right direction and our board of directors deserves a word of praise for their actions in the matter.

 

January 12, 1889

T.F. JARVIS has purchased Mr. DONAHUE’s interest n the pump business.  The new firm will be styled FREGOE & JARVIS.  They are both old men at the business and will surely make a team hard to compete with.

 

January 12, 1889

If Geo. FORWARD had been waiting for a stormy day to move, he could not have picked out a worse on than Wednesday was.  Yet he moved just the same and by this time is settled.  Geo. never lets trifles interfere with his plans.

 

January 12, 1889

Ye ice dealers face which have been so long as a rail during this season were widened out with a seven-by-nine grin when the blizzard of Wednesday struck their locality.  The warm rays of the sun on Thursday contracted it broadwise somewhat.

 

January 12, 1889

The Spring Valley Creamery located toward the southwest part of the county burned on Sunday morning, at a loss of $2,000 insurance.  The buildings will be reconstructed and in the meantime, the Garden Plain creamery will use the cream which was taken to that place.

 

January 12, 1889

Johnnie BLAINE, second son of Jessie K. BLAINE, of Newton township, who was sent to Chicago last week to have a cancer on his shoulder removed, died Dec. 21, from the effects of the operation.  He had his arm shoulder joint and shoulder blade out.  His remains arrived here Tuesday evening and were buried at Kingsbury, Thursday. – Erie Independent.

 

January 12, 1889

We hear Hon. J.W. WHITE’s name mentioned for the position of Chairman of the Appropriations Committee.  This is one of the best committees of the House.

 

January 12, 1889

Henry GILES walked right into the Captain’s office this week, took out his pocket book and without a word of grumbling paid the cash for another years [sic] subscription.  When Henry has anything to do he does it in a businesslike manner.

 

January 12, 1889

The house on a farm 3 miles southwest of Coleta, in possession of O.W. TERPENNY, of that place, was burned to the ground Sunday.  A German occupied the place, and had been given ten day’s notice to leave, a few days before.  The furniture was also destroyed.  The total loss may have reached $300.

 

January 12, 1889

Gus. HEIN, who has been visiting with his parents here for the past week, made the Tornado office a call Monday before taking the train for home.  Gus is an old standby of the Tornado having read it since its first issue.  He is thinking some of locating here and we hope he will for we cannot have too many citizens like him.

 

January 12, 1889

While engaged in putting in a tubular well at Walnut last Saturday, E.L. FROEGOE got his hand caught between the drill chain and the cog-wheel.  The fingers and hand were badly mashed and the second finger was broken.  He took the noon train for home and the injured hand is doing as well as could be expected, though it will be some time before it is of much use to him.

 

January 12, 1889

The LaMoille Canning Factory, which was incorporated last spring, done very well for the first year’s experience.  They put up 135,000 cans of corn and 17,000 cans of tomatoes.  The tomato crop was cut short by the frost, some of the farmers only getting one picking.  The yield of corn paid the farmers from $12.50 to $19.00 per acre.  John ANSONET of Molden sold the company 600 bu. of tomatoes.

 

January 12, 1889

A fall line of Garland cook stoves and heater stoves, at Alf. SMITH & Bro’s.  Call and see them.

 

January 12, 1889

A couple of chaps from the Celestial dominions dropped into Spring Valley the other day. The boys soon espied them and began to have a little sport at John Chinaman’s expense.  The crowd grew larger as time flew by and to get rid of their tormentors they sought safety by boarding the cars and seeking other scenes.  No washee in Spring Vallee for Chinee allee samee me goee.

 

January 12, 1889

The Union Services at the Baptist church last Sabbath evening were largely attended, the house hardly affording seating room for all.  These union services are to be held during the winter months, alternately at the Baptist and Methodist churches.  Last Sabbath Rev. BALDWIN fill [sic] the pulpit and took the bible for his text, reading the first and last verses.  His discourse was entertaining, inspiring and full of thought.  He is a fluent speaker and his illustrations are apt and meritorous [sic].

 

January 12, 1889

Superintendent TUTTLE is talking of getting up an entertainment for the 22nd of February, Washington’s birthday.  He says he wants to make the affair intensely patriotic.  The G.A.Rs. and the band boys as well as others ought to be asked to join and lend a helping hand.  A procession headed by the band, following next the old soldiers with flag, guns, etc., the Hook and Ladder Co., civilians, etc., would be a good feature.  A dinner and to conclude with exercises in the hall in the evening would make a program that would interest all.  Hope he’ll carry it out.

 

January 12, 1889

Joseph KEMP is at present erecting a dwelling on St. Paul st. [Spring Valley] and soon expects to make his home there.

 

January 12, 1889

Mr. and Mrs. BOOSE reside there [Spring Valley] and have for two years.  Our readers are not very well acquainted with Mr. B. though almost all know Mrs. B. nee Lottie SANDERS.

 

February 23, 1889

H. M. McKENZIE of Elwood, Iowa, called on our office Friday morning and left $1.50 with me for the Tornado for another year.

 

February 23, 1889

KILL THAT ANIMAL - A grand hunt will take place Tuesday February 26th, 1889.  The intention of this hunt is to capture or kill the wild animal that has created so much excitement in this locality this winter.  There will be four townships surrounded, viz, Manlius, Greenville, Fairfield, and Gold. A meeting was held at New Bedford and the following named officers was appointed to take charge of and command the force:

   Co.-  A         D.A. DILLER and sons

            B         Ben MUNSON, M. BOWEN, Geo BROWNE

            C         Pastor McDONELL, W. BENNER, Frank EALIE

            D         Robt. HILLER, Morg. RENNER, I.S. HAYES

            E          Henry KERLY, Jim WOODARD, J. BURTON

            F          Frank GREENWOOD, Oliver HEWLETT, B. [Byron] HOGEBOOM

            G         John THOMAS, N.S. LATHROP, Amel JOHNSTON

            H         Samuel BROWN, W. ENGELTON, D. BREAL

            I           Edward NEWELL, Henry BILLS, C. McCULLEY

            J           Joseph KOLP, George DABLER, W. WHITE

Every body to be in line by 10 o'clock sharp, and ready to march.  The place decided upon for the center or closing in place, is known as Lost Grove, about half a mile north of Pat HAGAN's and J.Y. SPANGLER's places.  Another meeting will be held at New Bedford Thursday evening, Feb. 21st, 1889, to make other arrangements if needed.  Every body invited to join in this hunt, as a good time is anticipated.  A large number of wolves will undoubtedly be killed and probably the "What-is-it."

 

February 23, 1889

Mr. and Mrs. W.J. LOVE [Margaret and William?] were guests of Mr. and Mrs. J.F. LEONARD over Tuesday night.

 

February 23, 1889

We are pained to report the severe illness of Hi McKENZIE, who is very low.

 

February 23, 1889

A warmer, better protected house can't be found in town than H.H. [Tip] DOW.

 

February 23, 1889

Fourteen above zero with winds blowing from the south Thursday morning at six.

 

February 23, 1889

At six o'clock Tuesday morning the thermometers around here registered three or four degrees below zero.

 

February 23, 1889

Geo. JOHNSON and family of Morrison spent several days visiting pa McNAUGHTON's folks, returning home last Monday.

 

February 23, 1889

H.M. McKENZIE of Elwood, Iowa, called at our office Friday morning and left $1.50 with us for the Tornado another year.

 

March 2, 1889

Wonder if Ed DOW, of P-town will be as anxious to live up to the terms of the lease of his farm now that O. [Oliver] McKENZIE has it, as he was when that poor widow lady was party to the contract?

 

March 2, 1889

Fred GLASSBURN took the blue ribbon at the wolf hunt for getting the largest game - he shot a cow.

 

March 9, 1889

H. H. [Hiland] HOGEBOOM called upon us Friday morning and not only renewed his subscription, but those of his two friends J. E. McNAUGHTON and Norman SYKES which he has been sending for years.  Such me as Mr. H., are truly appreciated by newspaper men the world over.  He understands that to have a good paper it must be well patronized and given his share willingly and freely.  Would there be more such men in this vicinity.

 

March 9, 1889

Ed DOW and Oliver McKENZIE  are having a tussle over the right to lease a farm in Yorktown.

 

March 23, 1889

B.E. [Byron] HOGEBOOM called upon us and renewed his subscription and hereafter will get his mail in Thomas.

 

April 6, 1889

Mrs. J.F. [Elizabeth] McNAUGHTON is at Morrison visiting her daughter Mrs. Geo. JOHNSON [Jennie? Capitola?].

 

April 6, 1889

Pupils on the Roll of Honor:  May BOGART, Sadie BOGART, Frank BLACK, Herbert McGRADY, Nellie MOSIER, Chas. SHAW, Nathan WINCHELL, Ethel WEST, Frank WEST, Lewis WINCHELL.

For one year; Nellie MOSIER, Ethel WEST.  For two years; Ethel WEST.

Lewis WINCHELL, was sent home on account of measle scare.

 

 

April 6, 1889

Fairfield election results for Justice of the Peace:  N.J. HOGEBOOM 113, J.B. KNOWLTON 77, T. SANDERS 52

 

April 20, 1889

H.H. [Tip] DOW has resigned his place in McMILLAN's Lumber Yard.  He has been a faithful hand and although liking the business he was compelled by gradual failure in use of his arm to seek something where brains could be used and less manual labor.  Will STILSON takes his place.

 

April 27, 1889

Quite a number of farmers are this year taking hold of the fruit tree deal.  Mr. H. [Hiland] HOGEBOOM set out quite a little orchard.  Fruit trees have not thrived well here for a number of years and many orchards have died out entirely; but farmers are loath to abandon the idea having their own apple trees although few trees have been set out in the past years are taking hold this year seemingly determined to try once more.

 

April 27, 1889

Fred ALLEN has been at work for Mr. THACKABERRY lately, painting.

TAMPICO AREA HISTORICAL SOCIETY - MUSEUM - FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY/RESEARCH CENTER  119 Main St., P. O. Box 154,  Tampico, IL  61283   www.tampicohistoricalsociety.com   tampicohistoricalsociety@gmail.com  President Joan Johnson, 815-438-7581 or garyjoan@thewisp.net  Family History Coordinator, Denise McLoughlin 815-590-2143. We are an all-volunteer organization so your donations are always appreciated!  Sign up to receive our e-newsletter. Thank you!  Visit us on FACEBOOK, too.