Welcome to Tampico, Illinois
Obits > OBIT - Mark Lyon - 1908

Submitted by Sandi Hartnell 8/16/04

Sterling Evening Gazette
Tuesday, June 16, 1908

 “Lock Jaw Brings Death. Mark Lyon of Tampico Died Monday Afternoon at Hospital in Chicago - Funeral Thursday Afternoon: Mark Lyon of Tampico died in a Chicago hospital Monday afternoon of lock jaw. His family arrived at this bedside to be with him a few hours before his death. The remains were brought to Tampico this afternoon, accompanied by his family. The funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon, and will be under the auspices of the Masons, of which he was a member. The hour of the funeral has not been set.

Mr. Lyon was a victim of a runaway the fore part of last week, in which he was quite badly injured, although nothing was thought of the injuries at the time. On Friday evening he felt unwell, and going to a local physician it was found that lock jaw was developing and he was hurried to a Chicago hospital.

Mr. Lyons [sic] was given no relief in Chicago and gradually grew worse. The family was summoned to his beside before his death.

Mr. Lyons [sic] was a well known citizens [sic] of Tampico. He was about fifty years of age, and highly respected. Several years ago he retired from farming and entered the stock buying business. He is survived by his wife and three children.

” Sterling Evening Gazette
Saturday, June 20, 1908
“Knew His Doom; Met It Bravely. Pathetic Circumstance That Attended the Death of M. R. Lyon. He Kept It From Family. A Daughter Had Died of the Disease and He Was Familiar With Its Deadly Symptoms. Tampico, June 18 - Special correspondence.
M. R. Lyon, one of Tampico’s prominent citizen [sic], died at a hospital in Chicago at 7 o’clock Monday evening of lock jaw, caused by injuries received in a runaway on Monday morning a week before his death.

He and two daughters started for the farm, a mile east of town, and were thrown out of the buggy as has already been stated in these columns. The young ladies were not hurt but Mr. Lyon was thrown to the ground, striking on his face, and injuring his nose. In three or four days he was around again apparently on the road to recovery. On Friday he noticed a twitching [sic] of the muscles of the face and on Saturday morning it was worse and his jaws were partially set. He immediately consulted Dr. Wahl and it was determined to go to Chicago on the morning train in hopes of getting help, but nothing could be done by the city physicians and he grew rapidly worse.

On Sunday, Mrs. Roy Olstead and Mrs. Frank West, two daughters, and Herbert, a son, went to Chicago via Sterling and immediately telephoned for the relatives to come at once as he was worse, and on Monday Mrs. Lyon, Mrs. John Plumley, a sister, Mr. Olmstead and Dr. Wahl went in via Sterling, and on Monday evening the news of his death reached here by telephone. He seemed to realize from the first symptoms that he was doomed, as he was familiar with the workings of the dreaded dseease, one of his daughters having died of it a number of years ago, from stepping on a nail. He is said to have remarked before leaving that he would never return alive, and to have tried to conceal the twitching of the muscles of his face from his family by holding a handkerchief to his face.

He was a strong, robust, healthful man, and the suddenness of his death has cast a gloom over the community.

The remains were brought to his late home where the funeral services were held Thursday at 1:30 o’clock.

He was one of Tampico’s most wealthy and influential citizens. Previous to coming to Tampico he resided on this farm six miles northwest of here, one of the finest farms in the country. His residence here is one of the finest in town. Since he moved to Tampico he has followed the business of buying stock.

He was a member of the Masonic lodge and that order had charge of the burial ceremonies. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Mt. Potter, who was assisted by Rev. John G. Armstrong of Maywood. He is survived by the widow and eight children - Lewis, of Colorado, Hubert who resides five miles west of here, Mrs. Frank West who resides on the home farm, Mrs. Roy Olmstead and Mrs. Stuart Olmstead of Prophets town, Mina, Minerva and Marcus at home; one brother, Dwight of Oklahoma, and two sisters, Mr. John Plumley of Hume and Mrs. Likens of Chicago to mourn his loss.

Marcus R. Lyon was born in Medina County, O., Feb. 27th, 1845, and died at Augustan hospital, Chicago, June 15th, 1908.

When five years of age his parents moved to a farm near Morrison where he resided until his marriage to Miss Minerva Miller at Wyoming, Jones County, Ia., Feb. 28th, 1870. The newly married couple lived for about five years on a farm near Morrison. In 1875 they moved to the farm now occupied by Frank West and lived there until they moved to Tampico about eight years ago.”

More articles submitted by Sandi Hartnell ~

1908 - Assorted Articles on Marcus Ruel Lyon

MARCUS RUEL LYON

Sterling Evening Gazette

Friday, June 12, 1908

“Hurt in Runaway: While en route to their farm east of town Monday morning, M>R> Lyon and daughters met with quite a serious accident. Mr. Lyon was driving a colt on a light trap and one of the shafts came loose. This frightened the horse and it started to run, throwing Miss Minerva, who was sitting on her sister’s lap, almost under the buggy so that two wheels passed over her body, bruising her slightly. Miss Mina jumped, clearing the buggy and was not hurt. Mr. Lyon thinking to save the rig still clung to the reins until one wheel was entirely smashed and the end of the axle ploughed into the ground and threw him out breaking his nose and cutting a gash in his face which required several stitches. As soon as Miss Mina regained her feet she followed the horse which ran east over the canal bridge where it slowed down to a walk dragging the ruined buggy and where she finally succeeded in stopping it. Mr. Cooney, who happened to be near, helped Miss Mina unharness the horse and drag the buggy out of the road. She then returned to her father and sister and tying the horse, ran to the home of Mr. Knox where she called her mother and the doctor by phone. Meanwhile Mr. Knox had gotten a rig ready and the party were brought back to town where Mr. Lyn’s [sic] wounds were dressed.”

Sterling Evening Gazette

Monday, June 15, 1908

“Mark Lyon Dying of Dread Lock Jaw; Prominent Tampico Citizen Will Not survive the Malady. Was Wounded in Runaway. Thrown From His Carriage and Badly Hurt About the Face - Taken to Hospital in Chicago: Mark Lyon of Tampico is believed to be dying of lockjaw in a hospital in Chicago. This morning his family was summoned to his bedside, it being feared that he would not live until they arrived in the city.

It will be remembered that Mr. Lyon was the victim of a runaway about a week ago. In the runaway his nose was broken, and his face lacerated.

Friday evening he complained of being unwell, and went to a local physician. On examination he showed signs of tetnus, and Saturday morning it had fully developed. He was hurried to a hospital in Chicago in hope of saving his life.

It is evident that the physicians at the hospital could do nothing for him, and he grew rapidly worse. It is nearly certain that the unfortunate man will die.”

Sterling Evening Gazette

Tuesday, June 16, 1908

“Lock Jaw Brings Death. Mark Lyon of Tampico Died Monday Afternoon at Hospital in Chicago - Funeral Thursday Afternoon: Mark Lyon of Tampico died in a Chicago hospital Monday afternoon of lock jaw. His family arrived at this bedside to be with him a few hours before his death. The remains were brought to Tampico this afternoon, accompanied by his family. The funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon, and will be under the auspices of the Masons, of which he was a member. The hour of the funeral has not been set.

Mr. Lyon was a victim of a runaway the fore part of last week, in which he was quite badly injured, although nothing was thought of the injuries at the time. On Friday evening he felt unwell, and going to a local physician it was found that lock jaw was developing and he was hurried to a Chicago hospital.

Mr. Lyons [sic] was given no relief in Chicago and gradually grew worse. The family was summoned to his beside before his death.

Mr. Lyons [sic] was a well known citizens [sic] of Tampico. He was about fifty years of age, and highly respected. Several years ago he retired from farming and entered the stock buying business. He is survived by his wife and three children.”

 

Sterling Evening Gazette

Saturday, June 20, 1908

“Knew His Doom; Met It Bravely. Pathetic Circumstance That Attended the Death of M. R. Lyon. He Kept It From Family. A Daughter Had Died of the Disease and He Was Familiar With Its Deadly Symptoms. Tampico, June 18 - Special correspondence.

M. R. Lyon, one of Tampico’s prominent citizen [sic], died at a hospital in Chicago at 7 o’clock Monday evening of lock jaw, caused by injuries received in a runaway on Monday morning a week before his death.

He and two daughters started for the farm, a mile east of town, and were thrown out of the buggy as has already been stated in these columns. The young ladies were not hurt but Mr. Lyon was thrown to the ground, striking on his face, and injuring his nose. In three or four days he was around again apparently on the road to recovery. On Friday he noticed a twitching [sic] of the muscles of the face and on Saturday morning it was worse and his jaws were partially set. He immediately consulted Dr. Wahl and it was determined to go to Chicago on the morning train in hopes of getting help, but nothing could be done by the city physicians and he grew rapidly worse.

On Sunday, Mrs. Roy Olstead and Mrs. Frank West, two daughters, and Herbert, a son, went to Chicago via Sterling and immediately telephoned for the relatives to come at once as he was worse, and on Monday Mrs. Lyon, Mrs. John Plumley, a sister, Mr. Olmstead and Dr. Wahl went in via Sterling, and on Monday evening the news of his death reached here by telephone. He seemed to realize from the first symptoms that he was doomed, as he was familiar with the workings of the dreaded dseease, one of his daughters having died of it a number of years ago, from stepping on a nail. He is said to have remarked before leaving that he would never return alive, and to have tried to conceal the twitching of the muscles of his face from his family by holding a handkerchief to his face.

He was a strong, robust, healthful man, and the suddenness of his death has cast a gloom over the community.

The remains were brought to his late home where the funeral services were held Thursday at 1:30 o’clock.

He was one of Tampico’s most wealthy and influential citizens. Previous to coming to Tampico he resided on this farm six miles northwest of here, one of the finest farms in the country. His residence here is one of the finest in town. Since he moved to Tampico he has followed the business of buying stock.

He was a member of the Masonic lodge and that order had charge of the burial ceremonies. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Mt. Potter, who was assisted by Rev. John G. Armstrong of Maywood. He is survived by the widow and eight children - Lewis, of Colorado, Hubert who resides five miles west of here, Mrs. Frank West who resides on the home farm, Mrs. Roy Olmstead and Mrs. Stuart Olmstead of Prophets town, Mina, Minerva and Marcus at home; one brother, Dwight of Oklahoma, and two sisters, Mr. John Plumley of Hume and Mrs. Likens of Chicago to mourn his loss.

Marcus R. Lyon was born in Medina County, O., Feb. 27th, 1845, and died at Augustan hospital, Chicago, June 15th, 1908.

When five years of age his parents moved to a farm near Morrison where he resided until his marriage to Miss Minerva Miller at Wyoming, Jones County, Ia., Feb. 28th, 1870. The newly married couple lived for about five years on a farm near Morrison. In 1875 they moved to the farm now occupied by Frank West and lived there until they moved to Tampico about eight years ago.”

 

 

From LYON & HARTNELL Families

CLICK ON PHOTO TO ENLARGE/OPEN ALBUM

TAMPICO AREA HISTORICAL SOCIETY - MUSEUM - FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY/RESEARCH CENTER  119 Main St., P. O. Box 154,  Tampico, IL  61283   www.tampicohistoricalsociety.com   tampicohistoricalsociety@gmail.com  President Joan Johnson, 815-438-7581 or garyjoan@thewisp.net  Family History Coordinator, Denise McLoughlin 815-718-3617. We are an all-volunteer organization so your donations are always appreciated!  Sign up to receive our e-newsletter. Thank you!  Visit us on FACEBOOK, too.